Italian cast off

Italian cast off DEFAULT

The tubular or Italian Bind-off is one of the border finishing technique I really like to use ! This kind of bind-off gives a really stretchy and cute border.

Work your k1/p1 ribbing border until you reach 2 rounds less than desired length . Then change to smaller needle. You have to go down of 0.5 mm, so for example if you have worked your ribbing with needle no 3.00 mm you have to use needle no 2.5 mm. And then continue as follows :

First round

1. If your round begins with a knit stitch, just knit it and move the begin of the round. Then slip the next purl stitch purlwise with yarn in front.

Arrêt extensible (1)_thumb[1]

Arrêt extensible (2)_thumb[2]

2. Knit next stitch

Arrêt extensible (3)_thumb[1]

Repeat from 1. to 2. until all the stitches of the round have been worked.

Second Round

1. Purl the purl stitches and slip the knit stitches purlwise with yarn in back. If the slipped knit stitches are slipped knitwise the stitch will be twisted on the bind-off round.

Arrêt extensible (4)_thumb[3]

After this round have been completed cut the yarn leaving a tail from about 3 times the length of the finished round.

Arrêt extensible (5)_thumb[1]

The tail has to be enough long to finish bind-off as you cannot change it during the last round.

To estimate a good length I wrap it around my work 4 times.

 

Binding – off

1. Insert your sewing needle knitwise in the purl stitch of left needle.

Arrêt extensible (6)_thumb[1]

Pull the yarn

Arrêt extensible (7)_thumb[1]

2. Insert your sewing needle from right to left in the knit stitch of the right needle and purlwise in the knit stitch of the left needle.

Arrêt extensible (8)_thumb[1]

Pull the yarn

Arrêt extensible (9)_thumb[1]

3. Insert your sewing needle purlwise in the purl stitch of the left needle (It’s the second time you pull the tail in this purl stitch).

Arrêt extensible (10)_thumb[1]

Pull yarn and drop the 2 stitches off the left needle.

Arrêt extensible (11)_thumb[1]

4. Insert your sewing needle knitwise in the purl stitch of left needle and pull yarn.

Arrêt extensible (6)_thumb[3]

5. Insert your sewing needle from right to left in the knit stitch just dropped and purlwise in the knit stitch of the left needle, and then pull the yarn.

Arrêt extensible (12)_thumb[1]

6. Insert your sewing needle purlwise in the purl stitch of the left needle (It’s the second time you pull the tail in this purl stitch).

Arrêt extensible (10)_thumb[2]

Repeat from step 4 to 6 until all stitches have been worked.

Arrêt extensible (13)_thumb[1]

After completing the round, pull the yarn in the wrong side of your work and weave it in end.

Arrêt extensible (14)_thumb[1]

Et voilà Sourire, a really lovely finished border !

 

You can find the French tutorial here

 

Happy knitting_thumb

 

 

Sours: https://www.stefanina-knitting-design.com/2011/04/tubular-or-italian-bind-off-worked-in.html

This tutorial is about a bind off that is ideal for finishing off “knit 1, purl 1” ribbing. It is known as an Italian or as a tubular bind off, but no matter how you call it, this way of closing stitches is definitely worth a try. It is stretchy, does not form a ridge and makes the ribbing wrap around the edge creating a beautiful polished look of a well-finished fabric.

The downside is – this bind off is a bit fiddly to make, but don’t worry, I’ll guide you through every step with detailed instructions and tips. 

A few notes before we get started:

1. This bind off is perfect for 1×1 ribbing. It works for other stitch patterns as well, but the finished look is not as nice.

2. It’s a variation of a “sewn bind off”, and that means we’ll work with a wool needle. Because a wool needle is usually sharper than a knitting needle, be careful not to split the yarn as you bind off stitches.

3. We’ll join stitches in pairs – knits to knits and purls to purls.

Now let’s get to binding off stitches! 

If you are a visual learner,click here to watch every step described below in a video tutorial.

PREPARATION ROWS

This part is optional. You can follow instructions in the “Bind Off Itself” part right away, but working preparation rows gives the bind off edge a more polished look. 

As you see in the photo below, the edge of the swatch on the left is flat while the edge of the swatch on the right is fuller and more rounded. That edge is made with the preparation rows.

Plus, these rows ensure that the edge won’t become too wide as you wear the project. Click here to see the difference in the amount of stretch between edges bound off with and without preparation rows.

If you’d like to make the edge moderately stretchy and nicely rounded, work two preparation rows before you start binding off stitches:

Row 1: [knit 1, slip 1 with the yarn at the front of the work], repeat brackets to the last two stitches of the row, then knit 1 and purl 1. 

Row 2: same as row 1.

As a result, you’ll get a look that is very similar to the look of 1×1 ribbing, but there will be strands in place of purl stitches in the top row.

I assume that your pattern starts with a “knit 1” because it’s the most common way to work “knit 1, purl 1” ribbing. If it starts with a purl stitch, then begin the preparation row with a “slip 1 with yarn in front” and knit the next stitch. The main idea is to knit the knit stitches and slip the purls.

BIND OFF ITSELF

Leave a tail that is at least three times longer than the bind off edge, and cut the yarn. Thread the tail into a wool needle. 

I will use a piece of yarn in a different colour to make the instructions easier to understand, but of course, in real life, the yarn tail will be in the same colour as the stitches.

1. The first step of the bind off edge is a bit tricky, but it is essential to make sure the right side of the edge nicely shaped. In this step, I will also assume that the first stitch on your needle is a knit.

Place the wool needle at the back of the first knit stitch and then insert it from left to right into the first purl stitch, as it is shown in the photo below, and in this part of the video.

Pull the yarn through.

2. Now we’ll join two knit stitches. Insert the wool needle from left to right into the first knit stitch on the needle. Slip this stitch off the needle. Then insert the wool needle into the next knit stitch from right to left.

Slip the second knit stitch off the needle along with the first purl stitch. Pull the yarn through, but don’t pull it too tight. Make sure the strand at the top of the work is about as long as one leg of a stitch. 

3. In this step, we’ll join two purl stitches. Insert the wool needle from back to front into the purl stitch that is slipped off the needle, and from left to right into the purl stitch that is on the needle.

Slip the purl stitch off the needle, pull the yarn through and form the strand at the top of the edge.

4. Now let’s join two knit stitches again. Insert the wool needle from front to back into the knit stitch that is slipped off the needle, and from right to left into the knit stitch that is on the needle.

Slip the stitch off the needle, pull the yarn through and form the strand at the top of the edge.

Repeat steps 3 and 4 to the end of the row. Then insert the wool needle from front to back into the last knit stitch, and from right to left into the last purl stitch.

Pull tight and secure the yarn.

Enjoy the beautiful bind off edge you’ve just created!

Elastic Bind Off for 1x1 Ribbing | 10 rows a day
Elastic Bind Off for 1x1 Ribbing | 10 rows a day
Elastic Bind Off for 1x1 Ribbing | 10 rows a day
Sours: https://www.10rowsaday.com/tubular-bindoff
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How to Knit the Tubular Bind-Off for 2x2 Rib

One of the most popular knitting tutorials I have ever shared on this blog is on the tubular cast-on. In today's blog post, I will be showing you how to knit its perfect partner: the tubular bind-off.

For many years, I avoided learning the tubular bind-off. I felt it was too complicated and unnecessary for the majority of my projects.

That was until I started knitting sleeves from the top down.

Bind-off for a Stretchy Edge

If you want to create a slim-fitting cuff on your sweaters, you will need a bind-off that stretches easily, otherwise, it will be uncomfortable around your wrists. The tubular bind-off is wonderfully stretchy and aligns beautifully with the wales of your rib, making it ideal for trims such as sleeve cuffs and sock ribbing.

If you're a fan of the neat finish you get with a tubular cast-on, you are going to love this bind-off. It may seem complicated at first, however, once you get the hang of it, you will want to use it on all of your trims!

In today's knitting tutorial, you will learn:

  • How to transfer 2x2 rib into 1x1 rib

  • How to knit the tubular bind-off

Knitting Tutorial: Tubular Bind-off for 2x2 Rib

Knitting the tubular bind-off on a 2x2 rib requires two steps. First, you need to transfer it into a 1x1 rib and then you bind it off afterwards.

My version of this technique doesn't require set-up rows like many do - I find that this doesn't affect the overall effectiveness of the bind-off. I have used a contrasting yarn to help you visualise the bind-off, however, on your own work, just use the same yarn as you used in your rib.

How to Transfer 2x2 Rib into 1x1 Rib (Written Instructions)

  1. Starting with 2x2 (k2, p2, repeat) rib, knit 1st stitch.

  2. Insert RH needle into the back of 2nd st on LH needle purlwise.

  3. Slip this stitch off the LH needle, forcing the 1st st off the needle, resulting in a live st.

  4. Catch the live st at the front of the work with LH needle, then slip 1st st on RH needle back onto LH needle.

  5. p1, k1, p1.

  6. Repeat steps 1 - 5 to end of the row.

How to Knit the Tubular Bind-Off

  1. Cut the tail of yarn approximately 3-4 times the width of the ribbing and thread tapestry needle.

  2. Insert tapestry needle into 1 st on needle knitwise and slip off the knitting needle. Draw yarn through.

  3. Insert tapestry needle into 2nd st on needle purlwise. Draw yarn through.

  4. Insert tapestry needle into 1st st on needle purlwise and slip off the knitting needle. Draw yarn through.

  5. From behind the work, insert tapestry needle between 1st and 2nd st on the needle. Draw yarn through.

  6. Insert tapestry needle into 2nd stitch on the needle knitwise and draw yarn through.

  7. Repeat steps 2-6 until the end of the work.

Now, it's your turn!

Next time you have to bind-off a ribbed trim, whether that's a neckline, a sleeve cuff or a sock trim, take the time to try out the tubular bind-off. It's easier than you think and will result in a perfectly stretchy bind-off.

This technique is used in my new pattern, Split Stone, which will be released on 2nd May 2017. Get ahead by learning this technique today, so that you'll be ready when it launches!

Sours: https://www.sistermountain.com/blog/tubular-bind-off
Invisible Bind Offs for K1P1 Ribbing, Italian BO vs Tubular BO

Ribbed Sewn Bind Off: 1×1

We’ve all bound off in rib stitch only to find that the edge is not nearly as stretchy as the ribbing itself. The Ribbed Sewn Bind Off is a great way to finish off a 1×1 rib while maintaining its elasticity.

For this technique you’ll thread the bind-off tail onto a tapestry needle and pass it through the remaining live stitches in four easy-to-remember, repeating steps. The result is super tidy and so nice and stretchy, you’ll want to finish off all your ribbed socks, necklines, and top-down sleeves with a Ribbed Sewn Bind Off!

Prefer to read all about it? Here you go!

Cut the working yarn to 4 times the length of the edge you are binding off. Thread the tail into a tapestry needle.

NOTE: All of the stitches referred to in these instructions are on the left knitting needle.

Set-Up Step 1: Insert tapestry needle into first stitch purlwise and leave stitch on knitting needle.

Set-Up Step 2: Bring tapestry needle to back of work and insert it between first and second stitches from back to front, then insert tapestry needle knitwise into second stitch and pull yarn through to back.

Now repeat the following four steps…

**Step 1: Insert tapestry needle knitwise into first stitch and take stitch off knitting needle.

Step 2: Insert tapestry needle purlwise into second stitch.

Step 3: Insert tapestry needle purlwise into first stitch and take stitch off knitting needle.

Step 4: Insert tapestry needle from back to front between first and second stitches, then insert tapestry needle knitwise into second stitch and pull yarn through to back.**

Repeat from ** to ** until 2 stitches remain.

Next Step: Repeat Step 1, then repeat Step 3. Done!

November 21, 2019 | Purl Bee

TAGS: Video Tutorials

Sours: https://www.purlsoho.com/create/ribbed-sewn-bind-off-1x1/

Off italian cast

Frosted CakeThink details don’t matter?

Consider the difference between a breakfast muffin and a four-dollar cupcake.

Or between the morning coffee you fix for yourself and the after-dinner coffee service you prepare for guests.

Between the epsom-salt bath you take for your tired feet and the petal-strewn, candle-lit bath you prepared for that second date.

Finishing touches are special, because they require extra effort.

They take love and intention and often they require skill – and all three are clearly visible in the end product.

Haven’t you found that this is true in knitting? Don’t you treasure the projects you’ve made with care?

One of the special details I included in the mitten pattern I published last week comes right at the beginning: the Italian Cast-On.

A Finishing Touch That You Can Do At The Beginning

Italian cast-on edge on worsted turquoise yarnJust like the Invisible Ribbed Bind-Off, the Italian cast-on makes a stretchy invisible edge that blends perfectly into 1×1 ribbing.

See how the cast-on edge seems to be hemmed, or rounded off? – – ->

The trick is the stitches that are used in the cast-on.

The Secret: Alternate Knits and Purls To Make A Ribbed Edge

With a normal long-tail cast-on, the stitches that go on the needle are knit stitches, with a chain of stitches around the bottom to hold them together.

With the Italian cast-on, you actually cast on a knit stitch and then a purl stitch (I’ll show you how), thereby avoiding any line or separation when you start ribbing.

“Did you know? The Italian cast-on blends perfectly into 1×1 rib because it’s made up of both knit and purl stitches.” Click to Tweet

Line Break
The trouble is, even though the Italian cast-on makes a perfect edge for ribbing, it’s not very sturdy on its own. It’s just one strand of yarn, like the backwards-loop cast-on.

So in order to make a gorgeous edge, the Italian cast-on needs reinforcement.

To Protect The Cast-On Edge, Add Tubular Set-Up Rows

What??

I know, right – “Tubular set-up rows?”

For whatever reason, that’s what they’re called, and they are the perfect partner for the Italian cast-on. They add sturdiness and strength to the edge by creating a reinforcement of alternately slipped and knitted stitches.

Know how when you slip a stitch, the working yarn makes a little ladder across the back of the stitch?

On projects like Fair-Isle sweaters, the unused colors “float” across the back of the work, adding strength and warmth.

When we use that same technique on the Italian cast-on, the little floats pull the knitting together while the slipped stitches reinforce the columns of the ribbing and make the knit stitches stand out.

Use This Cast-On For Projects With Worsted to Bulky Yarn

When should you take the trouble to do a stretchy, invisible cast-on like the Italian cast-on?

Italian cast-on with tubular set-up on worsted mittenAnytime you have a project that starts with highly-visible ribbing, you can add a nice edge using the Italian cast-on.

I especially recommend it for projects using bulky yarn, like my bulky-weight mitten pattern.

The reason for that is, the thicker the yarn, the more visible the cast-on edge.

You can see how it looks above on my Basic Worsted-Weight Mittens.

Tip: Brioche projects are a great opportunity to use the Italian cast-on.

Brioche knitting is just ribbing at heart, only stretchier, so you do need to use a special cast-on like this one to make sure that the edge doesn’t look funny.

In the video below, I use a bulky-weight yarn to demonstrate the technique. You can see what the edge is supposed to look like and how nice it looks, especially on thicker yarns.

Video: How To Do The Italian Cast-On And Tubular Set-Up

Written directions are below the video.

Italian Tubular Cast-On
Italian Tubular Cast-On

Italian Cast-On Written Instructions:

  1. Measure out a long tail of yarn for your cast-on.
  2. Place the yarn over your needle as you would normally do with a slipknot. No slipknot needed.
  3. Position your yarn in slingshot position.
  4. To cast on a knit stitch: Bring the needle towards you, under the far loop of yarn on your thumb, over the loop of yarn on your forefinger, back under the far loop of yarn on your thumb, and tighten the stitch up on the needle.
  5. To cast on a purl stitch: Bring the needle away from you, over the loop of yarn on your forefinger, down and under both the yarn on your forefinger and the far loop of yarn on your thumb, up and over the far loop of yarn on your thumb, and away from you again and under the loop of yarn on your forefinger. Bring the needle up and tighten the stitch to your needle.
  6. Repeat steps 4-5 until you have the number of stitches you need for your cast-on. When you knit to the first loop you have placed on the needle, knit it together with the last stitch.

Tubular Set-Up Written Instructions:

  1. Cast on an even number of stitches using the Italian cast-on. Turn work.
  2. Row 1: K1, sl 1 wyif, move yarn to back. Repeat across row. P last 2 sts together. Turn.
  3. Row 2: K1, sl 1 wyif, move yarn to back. Repeat across row. P last st.

Abbreviations:
sl 1 wyif – slip 1 with yarn in front

Are you going to try this technique out? Leave a comment and let me know what you think!

Acknowledgments:
1) I learned this technique from Nancy Marchant’s fabulous book, Brioche Knitting.
2) I have no idea where the name “Italian cast-on” came from, but it sure sounds fancy!

Resources:

Pretty swirly divider embellishment
In other news, I am now in Buenos Aires, Argentina! It’s the middle of winter here, and wow, even though I expected it, what a change from California!

I’ve started to explore my neighborhood, usually while rocking my chunky cabled legwarmers, the Aspen Ice hat, and some cashmere fingerless mitts.

First impressions of Buenos Aires: not sunny enough! I guess I’ve never lived in a city with tall buildings before – I see the sun on buildings outside my window, but when I go outside, it’s nowhere to be found.

Thankfully, if I get too cold, there’s always my daily driver:

Bikram Yoga Buenos Aires sign

The class is totally in Spanish, of course, and to me it sounds very beautiful.

The food: I found out right away that you don’t go to the grocery store if you want fresh produce. You go to the fruit-and-vegetable stand, and there are lots of them, and they’re open late.

They stack up the food in pyramids, and if they don’t have change for you, they just tell you they’ll give you another banana and call it even.

Speaking of food, we had a peanut butter tasting, with little spoons and everything.

Dani loved it right away: “Mmmm… qué rico.” Gi wasn’t so sure: “I guess it’s an acquired taste?” and their little one, Vera, refused to try it at all! Well, I suppose that’s how I feel about some of the food down here too…

Up next week, another long-awaited free pattern: Toe-Up Socks with a Heel Flap. See you then!

For another slick way to cast on for a ribbed project, check out Edge Treatments: How to Knit a Picot Hem.

Leave a comment below – I love to hear your thoughts.

Sours: https://www.knitfreedom.com/blog/tubular-italian-cast-on/
Italian Bind Off

Binding-Off Using One Color

Brioche knitting demands a loose bind-off. The Italian bind-off is the one to use if you want to match the Italian cast on. Other sewn bind-off’s such as Elizabeth Zimmerman’s sewn bind-off or the Stem Stitch bind-off from Montse Stanley’s Knitter’s Handbook also work well.

BO_Italian
Italian Bind OffThis bind-off has many names, Kitchner’s Rib bind-off, Invisible bind-off and Vogue Knitting calls it “knit one purl one bind-off”. Whatever the name, this bind-off works very well with brioche stitch. Cut your working yarn at 3 times as long as the row. Thread the yarn onto a blunt tapestry need and proceed as in illustration below:  

BO_Illustration_580x470

BO_Convention_470x240
Conventional Bind Off Work the row before binding off with a simple k1, p1 rib (that would mean working a brk1, p1 or a k1, brp1 in brioche terms). Bind off in ribbing by knitting the knit stitches and purling the purl stitches as you come to them, and passing the old stitch over the new stitch.BO_Stem_470x240
Stem Stitch Bind Off See Montse Stanley’s Knitter’s Handbook, page 90, or for a left to right version view it here. BO_EZ_470x240
Elizabeth Zimmermann’s Sewn Cast Off From Knitting Without Tears or view it here – you have to scroll down. 

 

 
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Sours: http://www.briochestitch.com/archives/onecolorbrioche/binding-off

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How to do an Italian cast off

In this DROPS video we show how to do an Italian cast off to a rib with knit 1, purl 1. With this technique we get an elastic cast off that is perfect for example on toe up socks, edge around neck, a shawl edge or sleeve edges when working top down.
Cut yarn long enough for your cast off, approx 4 times the length of the edge you are casting off.

Start by locking the first stitch like this: Insert the needle into the 1st stitch as if to purl and tighten. Do not slip the stitch of needle. Insert the needle from the back between the 1st and 2nd stitches so that the thread comes to the front, then insert the needle into the purl stitch. Then insert the needle into the 1st stitch as if to knit, lift the stitch off the needle.

Now the cast off starts:
1) When there is a purl stitch to sew off, sew as follows: Insert needle into 2nd stitch (knit stitch) as if to purl, insert needle into 1st stitch (purl stitch) as if to knit, lift the stitch off (the thread is now at the back of the work).

2) When there is a knit stitch to sew off, sew as follows: From the back, insert the needle between 1st and 2nd stitches. From the front, insert the needle into the purl stitch (2nd stitch), also from the right side, insert the needle into the 1st stitch as if to knit and slip the stitch of needle.

Repeat explanation 1) and 2) until the casting off is completed. We use the yarn DROPS Snow in the video. You can find patterns where this technique can be used by clicking the pictures below.

You can adjust the speed of this video by clicking on the icon, on the play bar.

Our videos do not have sound.

We are a worldwide company and our videos are watched by people around the world, speaking different languages, many of whom do not understand English.

We have therefore written instructions to accompany this video, and there is no sound to disturb while watching. Enjoy!

Sours: https://www.garnstudio.com/video.php?id=1516&lang=en


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