Harvard emeritus professors

Harvard emeritus professors DEFAULT

Professors Emeriti

Henry Charles Lea Professor of Medieval History, Emeritus
Associate of Lowell House
Jonathan Trumbull Research Professor of American History
Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor, Emeritus
University Librarian, Emeritus
Robert Walton Goelet Research Professor of French History, Emeritus
Charles Warren Professor of American History, Emeritus
George Martin Lane Professor of the Classics and of History, Emeritus
Gurney Research Professor of History
Gurney Professor of Islamic History, Emeritus
Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History, Emeritus
Kenneth T. Young Professor of Sino-Vietnamese History, Emerita
Sours: /people/emeriti

A. Privileges for Professors Emeriti

(1)   Teaching

After retirement, Professors Emeriti are welcome to teach one four-credit course per academic year from one of the following venues:

a. Emeriti may offer Freshman Seminars and should visit the following site to propose a seminar: https://freshmanseminars.college.harvard.edu/home; or,
b. Emeriti may offer departmental courses at the invitation of the department chair and with approval by the divisional dean; or,
c. Emeriti may offer courses through the Division of Continuing Education.

An honorarium is paid for course instruction. The level of this honorarium is determined annually by the FAS administration.

In all cases, the department should notify the divisional assistant dean of the faculty member’s plans to teach, prior to formal approval of the appointment. The divisional assistant dean will work with the department on a brief letter from the department chair to the Professor Emeritus/a, confirming the teaching and the honorarium amount.

At the invitation of departments or concentrations, Emeriti are also welcome to offer individual or group tutorials and may supervise undergraduate theses.

(2)   Graduate Advising

Professors Emeriti are welcome to continue to work with graduate students already under their supervision, although they may not take on newly enrolled students after retirement. Professors Emeriti are also welcome to conduct general examinations for continuing and newly enrolled graduate students.

(3)   Library Privileges

Professors Emeriti have continued access to all libraries and online resources. In addition, they may sponsor up to three individuals for the privilege of research assistant.

(4)   Email and IT

Professors Emeriti maintain FAS email accounts and network access. They may continue to make use of services provided by Harvard University Information Technology, including desktop support, research computing, hosting, and other services as needed while working in space provided by the FAS. They also continue to be able to use their Harvard ID card to make use of Harvard’s computer and associated purchase programs.

(5)   Space

a.   Offices and Library Studies

Professors Emeriti are provided with office space (although not necessarily that which they occupied before retirement) for traditional academic and pedagogical purposes, within departmental and divisional guidelines. If faculty have a library study at the time of retirement, the FAS considers that as office space. Retired faculty ordinarily do not have both a departmental office and a library study during retirement. Use of library studies will continue to be governed by the rules of the Committee on Library Studies, which include continued, active engagement in library research.

Every effort will be made to allow Emeriti who are actively engaged in library research to continue to use the studies they held at retirement, but under some circumstances, they may be asked to transfer to other studies.

As with other members of the faculty, study-sharing arrangements and short-term loans (when Emeriti are temporarily away from Cambridge) are made in consultation with the Committee on Library Studies.

All other library study regulations and protections that apply to the full-time faculty also apply to Professors Emeriti.

b.   Laboratories

The FAS welcomes the continued research activity of Professors Emeriti. The allocation of laboratory space will be based on the policies of the academic divisions or the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Space considerations being satisfied, Professors Emeriti may continue their research, primarily with postdoctoral collaborators, funded by research grants.

(6)   Research and Administrative Support

a.   Research Support

Upon retirement, previously accumulated funds in the faculty member’s FAS research account continue to be available to Professors Emeriti.

Professors Emeriti continue to enjoy the right to secure funds for sponsored research. Although the University places no restrictions on the source of funds, academic divisions or the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences may do so as part of their oversight of sponsored research. For example, academic divisions or the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences may wish to establish the principle that Professors Emeriti can accept only peer-reviewed sponsored projects.

Resident Professors Emeriti are eligible to apply for grants from Harvard faculty travel funds under the same rules that apply to full-time faculty.

b.   Administrative Support

Although Professors Emeriti ordinarily do not continue to have access to personal administrative support, they may make use of departmental resources to help prepare letters of recommendation for students and former students. Other administrative needs may be addressed at the discretion of the department.

(7)   Departmental and Other Administrative Service

Professors Emeriti are welcome to attend FAS Faculty Meetings as guests.

Professor Emeriti continue to receive newsletters, catalogs, and Faculty-wide mailings (unless they request that their names be deleted from the mailing list) and to be invited to departmental colloquia, lectures, and professional and social functions.

(8)   Compensation

When a retired professor charges his/her/their salary on a grant, the maximum amount of salary that can be charged will be based on what the federal government calls the Institutional Base Salary (IBS). The IBS at the time of retirement is converted from the 9-month academic year to an annualized amount. This conversion consolidates the academic year and summer/supplemental months. For example, if faculty member’s full-time, academic-year salary at the time of retirement was $150,000, his/her/their 12-month IBS would be $200,000. The salary should be set at the level of committed effort as indicated in the grant proposal/award. For example, if two calendar months of effort are budgeted, then the maximum salary to be charged to the grant would be 2/12ths of the IBS or, as in the example of the 12-month salary of $200,000 used above, $33,333.

The University’s medical plan rates, which are tiered based on salary and the plan an individual chooses, will, for retired faculty, be tiered based on the IBS, not on a faculty member’s part-time salary. This is consistent with how premiums are set for all other part-time employees. Please contact the Harvard Benefits Office at 617-496-4001 for further information.

Sours: /privileges-professors-emeriti
  1. Average swim pace
  2. Index dividers
  3. Rick and morty 5 episodes
  4. Water pallet costco
  5. Matching frog rings

Emeriti

Dwight Perkins
Emeriti- Harold Hitchigs Burbank Professor of Political Economy

Dwight H. Perkins' previous positions at Harvard include Associate Director of the East Asian (now Fairbank) Research Center, 1973-1977; chairman of the Department of Economics, 1977-1980; Director of the Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID), the University’s former multi-disciplinary institute for research, teaching, and technical assistance on development policy,1980-1995; and Director of the Harvard University Asia Center, 2002-2005. He has authored or edited twelve books and over one hundred articles on economic history and economic development, with special references to the economies of east and southeast Asia.

... Read more about Dwight Perkins

Lewis P and Linda L Geyser University Professor, Emeritus

Henry Rosovsky is the author of many articles and books, including Capital Formation in Japan (1961), Quantitative Japanese Economic History (1961),...

Read more about Henry Rosovsky
17 Quincy St
Office Hours:
By appointment
Alvin Roth
George Gund Professor of Economics and Business Administration, Emeritus

Alvin Roth is also the Craig and Susan McCaw Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He works in the areas of game theory, experimental economics and market design. He shared the 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics.

... Read more about Alvin Roth

Dept of Economics
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-6072
Jeffrey Williamson
Laird Bell Professor of Economics, Emeritus

Jeffrey Gale Williamson served as Chairman of the Economics Department 1997-2000 and as the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies 2001-2002 and...

Read more about Jeffrey Williamson
350 South Hamilton Street
Apartment 1002
Madison, WI 53703

When in residence:
Littauer 234

Office Hours:
By appointment only
Sours: https://economics.harvard.edu/people/people-type/emeriti
Paul Volcker at Harvard Law School: on preventing bank failures

Descriptions: Professors Emeriti, Research Professor

(1)   Professors Emeriti

A faculty member assumes the emeritus/a status upon retirement when the faculty member (a) retires from a tenured faculty position and (b) has reached the age of 60 or more. If these two conditions are met, the faculty member’s title automatically becomes Professor of [Department], Emeritus/a upon retirement. If the individual held an endowed chair while active, that title also carries forward with the Emeritus/a designation. This appointment remains active for the professor’s lifetime.

(2)   Research Professor

In accordance with FAS policies, the title “Research Professor” is available to individuals eligible for, or already holding, emeritus/a status. This title can be held for the five years immediately following retirement. Individuals who prefer this title, in lieu of the regular title of Professor Emerita or Professor Emeritus, should write to the Dean of the Faculty annually to state their planned research activities for the coming year.

The research professor title supersedes the regular title of Professor Emerita or Professor Emeritus during the period in which it is held, but research professors are eligible for all the privileges listed for Professors Emeriti Chapter 12, Section A. In the absence of the annual request for appointment, on specific request from the individual or at the end of the five-year period, the faculty member’s title will revert to the standard Emeritus/a designation.

(3)  Compensation

When a retired professor charges his/her/their salary on a grant, the maximum amount of salary that can be charged will be based on what the federal government calls the Institutional Base Salary (IBS). The IBS at the time of retirement is converted from the 9-month academic year to an annualized amount. This conversion consolidates the academic year and summer/supplemental months. For example, if faculty member’s full-time, academic-year salary at the time of retirement was $150,000, his/her/their 12-month IBS would be $200,000. The salary should be set at the level of committed effort as indicated in the grant proposal/award. For example, if two calendar months of effort are budgeted, then the maximum salary to be charged to the grant would be 2/12ths of the IBS or, as in the example of the 12-month salary of $200,000 used above, $33,333.

The University’s medical plan rates, which are tiered based on salary and the plan an individual chooses, will, for retired faculty, be tiered based on the IBS, not on a faculty member’s part-time salary. This is consistent with how premiums are set for all other part-time employees. Please contact the Harvard Benefits Office at 617-496-4001 for further information.

Sours: /descriptions-professors-emeriti-research-professor

Professors harvard emeritus

List of Harvard University Professors

This article is about the specific title. For a list of Harvard University faculty members, see List of Harvard University faculty.

At Harvard University, the title of University Professor is an honor bestowed upon a very small number of its tenured faculty members whose scholarship and other professional work have attained particular distinction and influence.[1] The University Professorship is Harvard's most distinguished professorial post.[2]

This honor was created in 1935 for "individuals of distinction ... working on the frontiers of knowledge, and in such a way as to cross the conventional boundaries of the specialties."[1] The number of University Professors has increased with new endowed gifts to the university. In 2006, there were 21 University Professors.[3] As of 2020[update], there are 25 University Professors.[4]

Present Harvard University Professors[edit]

Past Harvard University Professors[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2021)

Cornel West

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"University Professorships". Harvard University Office of News and Public Affairs. 2014. Retrieved 2015-01-21. Note, this does not include all Professors at the campus.
  2. ^ ab"Three Named University Professors". Harvard University Gazette. 1998-05-28. Archived from the original on 2011-05-23. Retrieved 2009-07-17.
  3. ^ ab"Gates named Fletcher University Professor". Harvard University Gazette. 2006-10-26. Archived from the original on 2006-11-04. Retrieved 2009-07-17.
  4. ^"University Professorships | Harvard University". Harvard University. Retrieved 2020-01-20.
  5. ^"Maskin named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. September 6, 2012. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  6. ^"Abbate named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. November 20, 2013. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  7. ^"Greenblatt named University Professor of the Humanities". Harvard University Gazette. September 21, 2000. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  8. ^"Summers named Charles W. Eliot University Professor". June 30, 2006. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  9. ^ abKavoussi, Bonnie J. (August 3, 2009). "King, Kirschner Named University Professors". Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  10. ^Vittor, Evan M. (June 8, 2004). "New Title To Honor Tribe, Whitesides". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  11. ^"Chemist Charles M. Lieber receives Harvard's highest faculty honor". Harvard Gazette. 2017-07-20. Retrieved 2017-07-21.
  12. ^Kamath, Vasant M. (November 3, 1998). "Mazur Named University Professor". Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  13. ^"Paul Farmer appointed University Professor". Harvard Gazette. December 16, 2010. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  14. ^Gavel, Doug (December 7, 2000). "Michael Porter named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  15. ^"Annette Gordon-Reed named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. July 28, 2020. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  16. ^ ab"Faculty Two named University Professors". Harvard Gazette. September 27, 2011. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  17. ^ ab"Minow named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. June 19, 2018. Retrieved 1 July 2018.
  18. ^"Ann Blair named University Professor". Harvard Gazette. November 23, 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  19. ^Donadio, Rachel (December 10, 2006). "The Closest Reader". New York Times. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  20. ^"Shapiro Named First Timken University Professor". Harvard University Gazette. October 16, 1997. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  21. ^"Sunstein a University Professor". Harvard Gazette. February 19, 2013. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Harvard_University_Professors
Introductory Remarks and Introduction of Professors - Harvard Thinks Big

Emeritus Professors Continue Work, Return from Retirement to Teach

Old soldiers may fade away, but emeritus professors keep right on working. This year, Sidney B. Fay, '96, professor of History, emeritus, came out of retirement on two-days notice to give History 132 when William L. Langer '15, Coolidge Professor of History, was called to Washington.

Of the nearly 100 living Harvard emeritus professors, more than half are still engaged in teaching, writing, or research, and many are still actively connected with the University.

One Friday afternoon last October, Fay, then 74 years old and retired four years, was asked by a Corporation member to teach History 132 again. Fay answered that he would be delighted to do so, and at 9 a.m. the next Monday, he began to lecture where he had left off years before.

Thought Teaching Over

Fay taught History here until 1946 and then at Yale for one year until 1947, when he thought his days of formal teaching were over. He began to devote his time to reading and study which enabled him to alter his History 132 lectures of today from the ones he used to give.

Fay said yesterday that he had added talks on imperialism and the impact of science on Europe.

When Fay first gave History 132, he reported it was less intensive than now since most undergraduates took five instead of the present four courses. The course then covered continental European History from 1815 to the present, while today it only runs to 1914.

Probably because of the lack of young teachers during World War II, Fay taught beyond the retirement ago of 66. In 1911, the Corporation voted that all faculty members of unlimited tenure, when they reach that ago "after long and faithful service," shall be given the title of professor emeritus.

By Corporation Request

In certain cases, however, the Corporation asks a faculty member to teach until he is 70 years old. In emergencies, such men as Fay, Julian L. Coolidge '95. professor of Mathematics, University Professor Roscoe Pound, and the late Alfred North Whitehead have been asked to teach even beyond the age of 70.

Advertisement

All faculty members, upon retirement, receive a pension from the University. During his tenure, every professor contributes five percent of his salary toward his pension; the University adds another seven and one half percent.

Coolidge, who is the former master of Lowell House, came back during the war to teach freshman Mathematics for several years. Since his retirement in 1940, he has also written several mathematical treatises, "The History of Conic Sections" and "The Mathematics of Great Amateurs," which deals with the achievements of men who were famous in another field and only debbied in math as a pastime.

The most famous of all emeritus professors is Charles Townsend Copeland '82, Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, emeritus. Today, at 91, "Copey" is a College legend. A teacher here from 1893 to 1927, Copey today just reads and takes occasional walks. On his 90th birthday last year, John Mason Brown '23, Walter Lippman '10, and many others paid tribute to him as their teacher and inspiration.

Three Forbes

Three Forbes are on the list of emeritus professors. Alexander Forbes '04, professor of Physiology, emeritus, said he has "moved from the Med School to the Bio labs." He is at present doing research to find certain relationships between the retina and color vision. Forbes is also working at Pershing Hospital in Framingham on anesthesia and narcosis. He "appreciates very much the opportunity to keep on working here."

Completing his term on the Board of Overseers this June is Edward W. Forbes '95, director of the Fogg Museum, emeritus, who heads three Overseers visiting committees: Fine Arts and Fogg, Museum, Music, and Semitic and Egyptian Civilization. He is now raising money for an Egyptian lectureship here. In addition, he is helping establish the new American Research Center in Cairo, Egypt.

Also Does Research

The third Forbes, George S. Forbes '02, professor of chemistry, emeritus, is also doing research. Since his retirement in 1948, Forbes has taught part time at Northeastern, started a project to evaluate and codify reaction rates, and studied reactions in solutions for the National Research Council.

One professor who is still very interested in the faculty problems of today is Charles H. MacIlwain, Eaton Professor of the Science of Government, emeritus. He advocates group over individual tutorial and feels that all Government concentrators should receive tutorial with groups of five "ideal," MacIlwain was one of the original preceptors of group tutorial at Princeton in 1905 under Woodrow Wilson.

MacIlwain, whose texts are used in several Government courses, is now working with a former student, Paul Ward, professor of Government at Colby, on a re-edition of a 16th Century work on the structure of English courts. The book, Lombard's "Archeion," was written in 1591 and last published in 1635.

Advertisement

Thomas Reed Powell, Story Professor of Law, emeritus, is also still teaching. He lectures on American Constitutional Law at Suffolk Law School and at the New School for Social Research in New York and still attends all the meetings of the Faculty of Law. Another lawyer, Samuel Williston, Dane Professor of Law, emeritus, visits Langdell every day. At 89, he is America's foremost authority on contracts.

Two retired English professors, Bliss Perry, Higginson Professor of English Literature, and Fred N. Robinson '91, Gurney Professor of English Literature, are still busily engaged in their former work.

Robinson has been teaching early English literature, especially Chaucer, in various places throughout the country. At the same time, he has done editorial work for the journals of the American Academy in Boston and the Medieval Academy.

Perry, at 90, has an attitude which is typical of all the retired faculty members. According to his friends, he is still going through several books a week, "reading to learn."

Sours: https://www.thecrimson.com/article/1951/5/25/emeritus-professors-continue-work-return-from/

Similar news:

.



369 370 371 372 373