Rusk county precinct map

Rusk county precinct map DEFAULT

GLO Historic County Maps

About the Collection

These historic county maps are cadastral (land ownership) maps, showing original surveys, usually made by virtue of a land grant, within a particular county in Texas. In many ways, these maps represent the foundation of the GLO archival map holdings, as they tie directly into the original land grant documents that are also housed at the GLO. As land was patented by settlers, meaning title was issued from the sovereign government, more surveys were shown on GLO maps. Successive versions of these maps reflect those changes. In short, these maps show the development and expansion as settlement progressed throughout each county in Texas.

Formats represented include manuscripts, lithographs, some early photographs, and blueprints/bluelines. The scale is generally 1 inch to 4000 varas. Most of the maps were compiled and drawn by draftsmen at the GLO. Most are manuscript maps, meaning original hand-drawn works. On many maps, draftsmen drew intricate designs and added whimsically detailed art, adding character to many maps in this collection. Some of the earliest maps were created by District or County Surveyors in Texas, before the GLO began to employ its own draftsmen for this purpose, due to the generally poor quality of maps sent to the GLO by County and District Surveyors. A few maps are lithographs that were privately issued by railroad companies and title companies.

Several well-known individuals worked as draftsman at the GLO and their work is represented here, including the famous short story writer and satirist O. Henry (William Sydney Porter), Texas artist Hermann Lungkwitz, Old Land Office Building architect Conrad C. Stremme and well-known Texas cartographer Charles W. Pressler.

History

Established in 1837, the Archives of the Texas General Land Office consists of land grant records and maps dating to the 18th century relating to the passage of Texas public lands to private ownership. Still important to Texans because of their legal value, the materials are also now highly regarded by genealogists, historians, archeologists, and surveyors.

The Archives of the Texas General Land Office consists of approximately 35.5 million land grant records dating back to 1720 and approximately 80,000 maps, sketches and plat maps of Texas, dating back to 1753.

To date, the GLO has posted more than 2 million documents and 80,000 maps, sketches and drawings on their own website, only a small portion of which are represented here. Map reproductions are available for purchase from the GLO website: http://www.glo.state.tx.us/archives.html



At a Glance




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Nacogdoches County, TX

1111

Webb County, TX

1111

Goliad County, TX

1010

Erath County, TX

99

Travis County, TX

99

Colorado County, TX

88

Dallas County, TX

88

Jack County, TX

88

Jasper County, TX

88

Jefferson County, TX

88

Cass County, TX

77

Coleman County, TX

77

Cottle County, TX

77

Fannin County, TX

77

Hopkins County, TX

77

Kinney County, TX

77

Matagorda County, TX

77

Montgomery County, TX

77

Parker County, TX

77

Polk County, TX

77

Tarrant County, TX

77

Bastrop County, TX

66

Bexar County, TX

66

Blanco County, TX

66

Brazoria County, TX

66

DeWitt County, TX

66

Ellis County, TX

66

Floyd County, TX

66

Hamilton County, TX

66

Harris County, TX

66

Hunt County, TX

66

Karnes County, TX

66

Kerr County, TX

66

Kimble County, TX

66

La Salle County, TX

66

Lamar County, TX

66

Leon County, TX

66

Liberty County, TX

66

Maverick County, TX

66

McLennan County, TX

66

Palo Pinto County, TX

66

Potter County, TX

66

Red River County, TX

66

Refugio County, TX

66

Runnels County, TX

66

San Augustine County, TX

66

Starr County, TX

66

Uvalde County, TX

66

Van Zandt County, TX

66

Victoria County, TX

66

Washington County, TX

66

Wilson County, TX

66

Zavala County, TX

66

Archer County, TX

55

Austin County, TX

55

Bowie County, TX

55

Brown County, TX

55

Burleson County, TX

55

Caldwell County, TX

55

Callahan County, TX

55

Childress County, TX

55

Concho County, TX

55

Coryell County, TX

55

Dickens County, TX

55

Dimmit County, TX

55

Fort Bend County, TX

55

Frio County, TX

55

Guadalupe County, TX

55

Hale County, TX

55

Hardin County, TX

55

Haskell County, TX

55

Hill County, TX

55

Houston County, TX

55

Jackson County, TX

55

Johnson County, TX

55

Jones County, TX

55

Mason County, TX

55

McCulloch County, TX

55

Nueces County, TX

55

Orange County, TX

55

Panola County, TX

55

Pecos County, TX

55

Shelby County, TX

55

Smith County, TX

55

Taylor County, TX

55

Wharton County, TX

55

Williamson County, TX

55

Wise County, TX

55

Anderson County, TX

44

Armstrong County, TX

44

Baylor County, TX

44

Bee County, TX

44

Bosque County, TX

44

Brazos County, TX

44

Briscoe County, TX

44

Calhoun County, TX

44

Chambers County, TX

44

Cherokee County, TX

44

Clay County, TX

44

Collin County, TX

44

Comal County, TX

44

Denton County, TX

44

Eastland County, TX

44

Edwards County, TX

44

Falls County, TX

44

Fayette County, TX

44

Freestone County, TX

44

Galveston County, TX

44

Garza County, TX

44

Gillespie County, TX

44

Gonzales County, TX

44

Hall County, TX

44

Harrison County, TX

44

Hartley County, TX

44

Hemphill County, TX

44

Henderson County, TX

44

Kaufman County, TX

44

Knox County, TX

44

Lampasas County, TX

44

Lavaca County, TX

44

Madison County, TX

44

Medina County, TX

44

Menard County, TX

44

Montague County, TX

44

Moore County, TX

44

Rains County, TX

44

Rusk County, TX

44

Sabine County, TX

44

Stonewall County, TX

44

Titus County, TX

44

Tom Green County, TX

44

Trinity County, TX

44

Upshur County, TX

44

Wichita County, TX

44

Wood County, TX

44

Atascosa County, TX

33

Bailey County, TX

33

Bell County, TX

33

Burnet County, TX

33

Carson County, TX

33

Castro County, TX

33

Comanche County, TX

33

Cooke County, TX

33

Deaf Smith County, TX

33

Delta County, TX

33

Duval County, TX

33

Grayson County, TX

33

Gregg County, TX

33

Grimes County, TX

33

Hansford County, TX

33

Hays County, TX

33

Hood County, TX

33

Kent County, TX

33

Lamb County, TX

33

Sours: https://texashistory.unt.edu/explore/collections/GLOHCM/

Commissioners

Definition
The Texas Constitution specifies that the Commissioner's Court is the governing body of the County and is to carry out the administrative and judicial responsibilities for the State, as well as a growing number of permissive authorities.

Main Functions
The main functions performed by the Commissioner's are:
  • Appointing numerous officials
  • Approving all County expenditures
  • Assuring safe-keeping of records
  • Building and maintaining public buildings and facilities
  • Determining how all revenue is distributed
  • Developing and managing the County budget
  • Establishing and enforcing land development regulations
  • Establishing and managing personnel policy
  • Letting contracts be in the name of the County
  • Maintaining and building County roads
  • Promoting cooperative planning opportunities
  • Providing a courthouse and jail
  • Providing all election services
  • Providing for law enforcement
  • Providing health and welfare services
  • Setting the County tax rate
Sours: https://www.rockwallcountytexas.com/101/Commissioners
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Rusk Countyis a county in Texas. The county population was 53,923 in 2014, according to the United States Census Bureau.[1]The county seat is Henderson.

Ballotpedia provides comprehensive coverage of the 100 largest cities in America by population. This encompasses all city, county, and special district elections appearing on the ballot within those cities. This county is outside of that coverage scope.[2]

Use the links below to learn more about federal officials, state officials, cities, school districts, courts, and ballot measures in this county.

Federal officials

The current members of the U.S. Senate from Texas are:

Office titleOfficeholder nameDate assumed officeParty affiliation

U.S. Senate Texas

John Cornyn

December 2, 2002

Republican Party

U.S. Senate Texas

Ted Cruz

January 3, 2013

Republican Party


To view a map of U.S. House districts in Texas and find your representative, click here.

State officials

The following is a list of the current state executive officials from Texas:


To view a list of state legislators from Texas, click here.

Cities

As of October 2021, Ballotpedia does not provide coverage for any cities in Rusk County, Texas. For a list of cities covered by Ballotpedia, click here.

School districts

As of October 2021, Ballotpedia does not provide coverage for any school districts in Rusk County, Texas.

Courts

See also: Rusk County, Texas (Judicial)

The following courts are located in Rusk County, Texas. This list is not meant to be comprehensive:

  1. Rusk County Court, Texas
  2. Rusk County Court at Law, Texas
  3. Texas Sixth District Court of Appeals
  4. Texas Twelfth District Court of Appeals
  5. Texas judicial district 4

Ballot measures

See also: List of Texas ballot measures and Rusk County, Texas ballot measures

To view a list of statewide measures in Texas, click here.

To view a list of local ballot measures in Rusk County, Texas, click here.

See also

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Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Rusk_County,_Texas
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The City Secretary serves as the election official for the City of Henderson municipal elections. City elections are to be conducted in accordance with the Texas Election Code. The next General Election will be on November 2, 2021 to elect the following:

  • Council Member - District One
  • Council Member - District Four
  • Council Member - District Five

The City of Henderson partners with Rusk County to administer elections and tabulate ballots. For the Notice of Deadline to File Application for Place on the Ballot, click here. To apply, please contact Cheryl Jimerson, City Secretary at City Hall, or by email

Please also contact the City Secretary for information regarding municipal elections like City Council or city initiated ballot items. 

Additional Resources

Sours: https://www.hendersontx.us/1268/City-Elections

Precinct map county rusk

Rusk County, Texas

Not to be confused with Rusk, Texas.

U.S. county in Texas

Rusk County Library in downtown Henderson
Rusk County Tax Office in Henderson

Rusk County is a county located in Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 53,330.[1] Its county seat is Henderson.[2] The county is named for Thomas Jefferson Rusk, a secretary of war of the Republic of Texas.

Rusk County is part of the Longview, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Longview–Marshall, TX Combined Statistical Area.

Rusk County is represented by Bryan Hughes, a Republican from Mineola, Texas, in the Texas State Senator for Senate District 1, which includes Rusk County. Travis Clardy, a Republican from Nacogdoches, is the Texas State Representative for House District 11, which includes Rusk County. Trent Ashby, a Republican from Lufkin who was born in Rusk County in 1972, represents District 57, which includes Angelina and several other mostly rural East Texas counties.

History[edit]

Prior to Texas annexation in 1845, the land while from time to time occupied by Caddoan peoples, was generally unpopulated until 1819 when Cherokee Indians, led by The Bowl settled in what is now Rusk County.[3] The Treaty of Bowles Village on February 23, 1836 between the Republic of Texas and the Cherokee and twelve affiliated tribes, gave parts of western Rusk County along with parts of today's Gregg and Van Zandt counties, in addition to the whole areas of Cherokee and Smith counties to the tribes.[4] They remained on these lands until the Cherokee War in the summer of 1839. Thus the Cherokee were driven out of Rusk County only to return in 1844 and 1845 with the purchase of 10,000 acres of land by Benjamin Franklin Thompson a white man married to a Cherokee. This established the Mount Tabor Indian Community,[5] some six miles south of present-day Kilgore that later spread to incorporate areas near Troup, Arp and Overton, Texas. Originally organized as a part of Nacogdoches County, Rusk was established as its own county by the Congress of the Republic of Texas on January 16, 1843. By 1850, it was the second-most populous county in Texas of the 78 counties that had been organized at that time, according to the 1850 census. Rusk County's population was 8,148 then; it was surpassed only by Harrison County with 11,822 people.

With the discovery of oil in Joinerville in October 1930, an oil boom began that caused county population to nearly double during the next decade, and caused dramatic changes in the county towns. Rusk is one of the five counties that are part of the East Texas Oil Field, whose production has been a major part of the economy since that time.[6]

Rusk County was one of 25 entirely dry counties in Texas until January 2012. The city of Henderson at that time opted to allow selling and serving beer and wine.[7]

America's worst school disaster happened in Rusk County in 1937, when nearly 300 people, most of them children, were killed in a natural gas explosion at the London Independent School District (which has since consolidated into West Rusk County Consolidated Independent School District).

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 938 square miles (2,430 km2), of which 924 square miles (2,390 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (1.5%) is covered by water.[8]

Major highways[edit]

under construction and will follow the current route of U.S. 59 in most places.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18508,148
186015,80393.9%
187016,9167.0%
188018,98612.2%
189018,559−2.2%
190026,09940.6%
191026,9463.2%
192031,68917.6%
193032,4842.5%
194051,02357.1%
195042,348−17.0%
196036,421−14.0%
197034,102−6.4%
198041,38221.3%
199043,7355.7%
200047,3728.3%
201053,33012.6%
2019 (est.)54,406[9]2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1850–2010[11] 2010–2018[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, 47,372 people, 17,364 households, and 12,727 families resided in the county. The population density was 51 people per square mile (20/km2). The 19,867 housing units averaged 22 per square mile (8/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 74.89% White, 19.21% Black or African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 4.22% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. About 8.44% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 17,364 households, 32.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were not families. About 24.20% of all households was made up of individuals, and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the county, the population was distributed as 24.90% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 15.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 104.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,898, and for a family was $39,185. Males had a median income of $30,956 versus $19,749 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,674. About 10.90% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.80% of those under age 18 and 13.00% of those age 65 or over.

Rusk County is home to three privately run facilities for state prisoners: the East Texas Multi-Use Facility for treatment of state inmates, privately operated by the Management and Training Corporation; the Bradshaw State Jail, also private, placed in idle status as of August 2020 because of declining populations;[13] and the Billy Moore Correctional Center, also privately run by MTC. [14]

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve Rusk County:

Rusk County's first officially authorized school was the Rusk County Academy.[15]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results

Year RepublicanDemocraticThird parties
202077.3%16,53421.7% 4,6291.0% 214
201676.7%14,67520.6% 3,9352.7% 524
201275.1%13,92424.0% 4,4510.9% 171
200872.9%13,64626.6% 4,9830.5% 93
200473.0%13,39026.7% 4,8990.3% 55
200069.8%11,61129.1% 4,8411.1% 181
199654.2%8,42338.6% 5,9887.2% 1,123
199245.6%7,56032.5% 5,39121.9% 3,623
198863.7%9,11735.9% 5,1400.4% 56
198470.4%11,08129.2% 4,5990.4% 61
198060.2%8,70538.6% 5,5821.2% 180
197652.7%6,80047.0% 6,0630.4% 52
197273.9%8,17925.9% 2,8670.2% 26
196829.8% 3,73932.5% 4,07837.7%4,729
196445.6% 5,48854.3%6,5280.1% 17
196055.4%6,00140.5% 4,3904.1% 449
195660.0%5,14039.4% 3,3810.6% 52
195249.7% 5,63450.2%5,6940.1% 12
194817.6% 1,29458.6%4,32223.9% 1,759
19449.3% 63776.5%5,23214.3% 975
19408.2% 70491.7%7,9010.1% 8
19366.6% 43393.3%6,1070.1% 8
19328.7% 48391.2%5,0740.2% 9
192837.4% 1,03362.6%1,732
192417.1% 65181.2%3,0971.8% 67
192026.0% 74554.3%1,55519.7% 563
191620.3% 52172.0%1,8497.7% 198
191221.9% 48865.1%1,45313.0% 291

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 23, 2013.
  2. ^"Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^Clarke, Mary Whatley (1971). Chief Bowles and the Texas Cherokees: a history. p. 17.
  4. ^Winfrey, Day (1825–1916). Indian Papers of Texas, Volume I: Treaty between Texas and the Cherokee Indians. pp. 14–17.
  5. ^Pynes, Patrick (2007). Historic Origins of the Mount Tabor Indian Community: Northern Arizona University. p. 74.
  6. ^Olien, Diana; Olien, Roger (2002). Oil in Texas, The Gusher Age, 1895-1945. Austin: University of Texas Press. pp. 170–171. ISBN .
  7. ^"TABC map of wet/dry counties as of June 2012". Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. Retrieved 2012-07-11.
  8. ^"2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 9, 2015.
  9. ^"Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  10. ^"U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 9, 2015.
  11. ^"Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010"(PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 9, 2015.
  12. ^"U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  13. ^Hedler, Ken (25 June 2020). "State to idle Bradshaw State Jail in Henderson; more than 200 workers will be laid off". Longview (Texas) News-Journal. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  14. ^Guevana, Emily (9 July 2016). "Chapel Dedication Set Sunday for Bradshaw State Jail". Longview (Texas) News-Journal. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  15. ^"Rusk County Academy." Handbook of Texas. Retrieved on October 6, 2010.
  16. ^Handbook of Texas Online, Megan Biesele, "New Salem, TX (Rusk County)," accessed November 26, 2017, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hnn16. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.
  17. ^Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-30.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°07′N94°46′W / 32.11°N 94.76°W / 32.11; -94.76

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusk_County,_Texas
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