Balsa model kit

Balsa model kit DEFAULT

Balsa Kit Manufacturers

Welcome to the Balsa Kit Research Service!

If you're balsa curious or want help finding a kit that inspires you to make some sawdust, just add a post to the end of this thread - I'm happy to help out and there are some very smart guys who chime in here too!

To get you started, here's my bookmark list of currently operating kit manufacturers that I've either bought from recently, or have on my wish list.

Ordered from, built, and absolutely love.... excellent kit quality, instructions, support, etc. I keep pictures of their planes in my wallet (right behind the wife and daughter). :love:If you're looking for a first balsa kit to build, you won't go wrong with one of these!

https://willynillies.com- new manufacturer in 2019 doing laser kits of 1/2 A and ACE designs!
https://www.stevensaero.com/
http://lainesplanes.com/
http://www.balsabuilder.com
http://www.mountainmodels.com/- potentially out of business, but if you can find his kits they are excellent!

Ordered from and would buy from again... quality very high! :D
https://jhaerospace.com/- great designs & kits from an active FliteTest community member!
http://www.radicalrc.com/(Would recommend as a 2nd or 3rd kit.)
http://www.manzanolaser.com/(Would recommend for the 4th or 5th kit)
http://retrorc.us.com/
https://www.towerhobbies.com/(Sig, Dumas, & Great Planes are all good quality brands here - design methods sometimes a little dated i.e. not many self-jigging models)
http://hobbyexpress.com/
https://www.andyclancydesigns.com/

Have a kit or two on my wish listor in my build pile but I haven't actually tried them yet. :unsure:
https://sonoranlaserart.com/nice laser cut gliders
https://microbirds.comcool little gliders and electrics!
https://skybench.comall about the gliders!
http://www.bmjrmodels.com
https://www.fokkerc.com/Giant scale warbirds!
https://www.moustachemodelworks.com/- new Giant Scale kit manufacturer on the scene in 2019!!
http://oldschoolmodels.com
http://www.balsaworkbench.com- laser cut short kits of classic designs
http://store.laser-design-services.com
https://www.sarikhobbies.com- based in the UK with an AMAZING selection of kits!
http://lazer-works.com/index.html
https://hangaronekits.com
https://www.carolinacustomkits.com
http://www.proctor-enterprises.com/
https://www.vintagemodelcompany.com
http://www.bridiairplanes.com
http://www.nationalbalsa.com/
http://www.bsdmicrorc.com
http://www.micronwings.com
http://www.easybuiltmodels.com/
http://lasercutplanes.com
http://brodak.com
http://iflyherr.com/
http://alienaircraft.com/
http://shop.balsausa.com
http://www.eurekaaircraft.com
https://www.greatflyerrc.com
https://www.guillow.comfree flight rubber focused
https://www.peck-polymers.com/free flight rubber focused
https://www.benbucklevintage.com/built and shipping from the UK
http://btemodels.com

In my experience with small kit companies (such as RetroRC or Laines), if something you want is out of stock just email and ask - they will cut based on demand as a lot of little companies don't have room or capital to have a lot of extra inventory sitting around.

Vintage Kit Sellers
https://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?g=flying-balsa-model-kits&mat=balsa
http://www.thebestthings.com/rc_model_planes.htm(I've ordered several times from this guy - fast shipper with accurate with descriptions)
https://www.flyboyzblog.com/store/

Out of Business?? :eek:
http://www.nanoplanes.net/no longer making kits but have released free balsa & depron plans of their Shark line of speedsters
http://hakits.co.uk/potentially one kit - no online store, phone in order only
http://www.parkscalemodels.com/shop/- Sadly Zeke is shutting down his business as of 3/21/2021. He is planning to put one final list of kits on the website after he finishes sending out existing orders. If you find these kits at auction, the quality is usually great - I really enjoyed building my Mini Drake!

On the other end of the market are places like Hobby King or Banggood whose kits I've both used, and won't inflict upon myself again for a while. If you go for one of these expect the instructions will be useless or just plain wrong, at least some parts won't fit without modifications, and you'll get absolutely no support. :mad:

Once notable exception is the new HobbyKing Spacewalker kit that Wilsonman just built in 2017 - this could be HK turning a corner with their kit production & support. :unsure:

I'm hoping others will chime in with updates or other manufacturers I don't know about too.

Can't find a kit you want? Try downloading some plans instead!
https://outerzone.co.uk/
https://aerofred.com/

Happy building!

 

Sours: https://forum.flitetest.com/index.php?threads/balsa-kit-manufacturers.35042/

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
We’ll start with a closer look at that picture of a ragged old cardboard box and the stuff I found inside it. Comet model airplane kits, as produced by Comet Model Hobbycraft, Inc. of Chicago, have been around since well before America entered World War II in 1941. Both their pre-War products and the model airplane kits they sold for a decade or so afterward pretty well define the popular notion of those balsawood model planes you cut out and glue together. Along with that recognition, unfortunately, came the contention that they always crash, they never fly! Generations of the people who insist on building them anyway have devoted time and effort beyond measure working to prove that this does not have to be true. I know. I have been one of them for nearly my entire life. What you are reading now is my most recent contribution to that legacy of optimism, along with what I hope you will find to be an interesting history lesson.

I built my first Comet kit (with a lot of help from my father) in 1949. It was a Firefly, a basic rubber-powered model with just a stout balsa stick for a fuselage. It cost twenty-five cents and came in a box very similar to the one we are talking about now, and it is entirely possible that this same Comet L-7 PIPER CUB box of balsa and paper was resting on a nearby store shelf at that very moment. Somebody bought it, but never built it. The subject…the “real” airplane the model represents…is a Piper J5-A Cub Cruiser, seventy-five horsepower three-seat civilian light airplane that first appeared on the market in 1940. It was customary in those days for nearly all the model airplane manufacturers to introduce miniature versions of each and every new airplane, civilian and military alike, as soon as possible after the general public became aware of them. Comet was at the head of the line with this practice, but I have not been able to determine whether they actually produced and sold L-7 PIPER CUB kits during the War. The earliest reference to it I can uncover describes it as being in the 1945 product line, but this box design did not appear until 1950. It was a common practice to repackage old stocks of kits like this using redesigned box art. It would appear that this is an older kit which got that treatment, because the kit itself holds a key to its own chronology.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
During World War II a lot of things ended up being rationed…gasoline, rubber for tires, silk and plenty of food items vital to the War Effort among them. Basic model airplane kits like this one were not rationed, but the balsa they were designed to use was. Younger model airplane builders…those who had not gone off to war…got used to finding a slip of paper bearing this declaration in such kits as were available.

IMPORTANT NOTICE
BALSA IS A CRITICAL WAR MATERIAL AND NOW MAY BE USED ONLY IN DIRECT WAR PRODUCTION
We are called upon as patriotic Americans to cheerfully make this further contribution to our Victory.
Parts of this kit are, therefore, supplied with substitute materials such as pine, basswood, cardboard, etc…

Another of those substitute materials was poplar wood, of which this saw-cut “spray” of strip wood is an excellent example. It turned out that there were a lot of those wartime kits still around When the time came to repackage them with postwar box art, it became clear that nobody found it necessary to sort through them and replace stuff like this with real balsawood. Perhaps half of the Comet kits I built prior to 1955 were like this one. At the age of nine or so I had never heard of poplar. I accepted that this was some strange variety of balsa and it was my responsibility to figure out how to make it work. Poplar is heavier than balsa, as well as being tougher and more difficult to sand or to cut accurately with a razor blade. It is also more oily than balsa to the extent that cellulose model airplane doesn’t stick to it very well. I am seriously committed to preserving those old time model building skills, but my interest in historical accuracy is not even close to being enough to persuade me to use that poplar in this airplane!

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
When kits like this were common on hobby shop shelves, you could count on there being a generous selection of sheet balsa as well as precisely saw-cut balsa strip to match just about any material dimension you were likely to find in any of those kits. Then, as now, the standard length of a sheet of model airplane balsa wood was thirty-six inches. A strip, or stick, of 1/16” x ¼” might cost something like five cents. Like a lot of other kids in those days it took me a while to realize that I could replace all that miserable poplar with good, honest hobby shop balsa for far less than the cost of another kit that might contain useable wood. You can still do that today…if you can find a store that stocks balsa along with modern RC planes…but the smart way is to cut your own strips from sheet balsa with a balsa stripper like this one. Here I am cutting a supply of 1/16” x ¼” and 1/16” x 1/8” strips from a leftover piece of 1/16” sheet. You’ll see them put to use as we start the actual building.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
Back in that first photo there are two folded-up sheets of paper. The one with pattern markings printed on it is the original plan sheet. The orange-looking material under it is the tissue covering that came in the box. We’ll take a closer look at that later. Before we have any sort of airplane structure to cover, however, we need to get that paper spread out flat on a suitable building surface. Because that piece of paper is about seventy years old, doing that required some special extra effort. No matter how carefully I worked to open up those brittle folds, most of them threatened to fall apart. It happens that I could search the various aeromodelling archives and probably find a repro copy of that Comet Kit L-7 plan, but I wanted the challenge of working with what came in the box as if it were the only option. The solution the problem turned out to be using some ordinary white wrapping paper as a backing sheet big enough to support the entire plan. Very carefully I spread out the eight or ten separate fragments of the old plan and arranged them into as close a match to their original alignment as I could. Having any of those fragile pieces stick to the new backing prematurely would have ruined it, so I used extra-hold hair spray to tack them down. Left to dry overnight that held everything in place well enough that I was able to attach a clear plastic cover sheet and then run the assembly through a commercial copier and make some durable black-and-white working plan sheets.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
Here’s one of those copies looking ragged, but complete and accurate enough to spread out on my “small model work table” and start some actual building.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
Now is the time to talk about what the term printwood kit means. In those days mechanical reproduction of parts was the only option. Electronic image transfer/copying was
not much more than something out beyond the distant horizon of creative imagination. If you wanted to make accurate reproduction of things like model airplane parts you traced out patterns by hand from printed original drawings. At that time the best source of model airplane information was via model airplane magazines. It didn’t take long to figure out that if you could prepare the necessary printing plates to publish those plans, there was no reason not to go one step further and print parts outlines directly on the wood that went into each kit. That was printwood, which is what we are working with here.

Around 1950, when this Cub was produced, kits featuring die-cut parts began showing up on the shelves, and that process quickly became the default for making kits with cut-out parts. It depended on intricate, hand-built arrangements of sharpened steel rule stock that replicated the parts patterns and cut them into appropriate sized sheets of balsa. It didn’t take long for advertising terms like pre-cut, prefabricated, quick assembly and so on to become common, and just about as quickly most everyone who wanted to build model airplanes began to agree that cutting out parts by hand from that printwood was too hard and took too long. It soon became clear that well made cutting dies could produce parts that were more accurate than the ones most guys could cut out with an old razor blade. But…even when cutting balsa wood, steel dies wear out and get progressively less sharp, and this is exactly what happened to the quality of the parts that came from them. Before long a new term, die-crunched balsa, came into common use. A skilled, patient model builder could match the accuracy of a new (sharp) die when cutting parts by hand, but again, most could not. Human nature being what it is, though, die-cutting quickly became the model airplane kit industry standard and by the end of the ‘50’s new printwood kits had just about disappeared. In recent years the quality offered by laser cutting technology has made everything else obsolete. Even that patient, experienced model builder would have difficulty cutting balsa parts of better quality…but this fact does not necessarily apply to the quality of the experience of traditional model airplane building. There are times when doing it all by hand makes it better. This is one of them.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
It all comes down to this. I am using a modern hobby knife handle with the default No. 11 blade to begin cutting out Part E-6 from this piece of 1/16” thick balsa printwood. There are several subtle techniques it’s necessary to master in order to get this part right.
Using a really sharp, new blade you might manage a one-stroke, along-the-grain cut in light balsa like this, but in this game there are no extra points for using the smallest possible number of knife strokes. Trying to do that just about guarantees forcing the blade, which is one of the most common causes of sloppy work. Make all straight line cuts with your blade supported by a straightedge. Curved cuts like this one are easiest to follow with a pointed blade. It’s difficult to find metal cutting templates that will fit all these different curves. If you’re not sure you can trace the printed lines exactly, cut outside the part. The margin of extra balsa this provides will be easy sand to shape later. If the balsa you have is too thick and/or too hard, again don’t force the blade. Any balsa more substantial than medium-hard 1/8” sheet may be challenging to cut accurately with a hand-held blade. This is the time to think about using a hand-held coping saw or even better, a powered scroll saw. It is also a bad idea to try to conserve blades. Most of the disposable razor/craft blades around today are made of steel that will not hold an edge well. You should be able to cut most 1/8” balsa diagonally or even straight across the grain with firm, even finger pressure on the blade and get a muffled pop as the edge completes a clean cut. When the cut edges of the balsa appear mushy rather than clean your blade is no longer sharp enough to make the kind of cuts you want. If you can afford to, toss that blade and use a new one. Our goal here should be to build wonderful model airplanes, not to see how long we can keep cutting with a worn-out tool.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
After all that, a newly-cut part should come out of the balsa printwood matrix like this. In this case the picture is indeed worth more than any more words.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
Let’s start putting this airplane together! Right here in this first step we can see four of the established “conventions” of stick-and-tissue model building in use. First, you can see how the plan sheet is spread out flat and fastened down (there are thumbtacks outside the frame).

Glue sticks to plans made of paper. When this kit was new model builders used waxed paper as a plans protector. The clear plastic wrapping film we have today works much better. Once that’s in place we assemble and glue the basic structural parts right over the pattern. On small models like this straight pins are the preferred means of temporarily holding parts in place until the glue dries. Wherever possible (when the parts are small enough) holding them by crossing pins over them rather than sticking them through the wood is best. Even little holes compromise structural strength. Here you can see that the cut-out balsa leading edge is in place along with a center section end and a stabilizer trailing edge made from some of that 1/16” x 1/8” balsa I stripped earlier.

Let’s Build a Real Old-Time Balsa Model Airplane   Part 1
Here’s the rest of the horizontal stabilizer outline in place. Just as I am doing here, use as many pins as necessary to keep everything in line. There is a lot of the tail assembly left to build. We’ll work on that next time.

Sours: http://www.rcmodel.com/2020/01/lets-build-a-real-old-time-balsa-model-airplane/
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Old Plastic Model Kits

Cavacraft Fokker D-7 - Factory Built Control Line Flying Model 1/2A Engines - 14 Inch Wingspan - (DVII), G-3

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$48   

Very rare. NOTE: build only, please read very carefully for the condition. 1950s wood pre-fab flying model for gas power U-Control. I am almost certain that the box artwork was originally painted by Jim Cox who also did all of the early Aurora box art paintings. Regardless of the manufacture he was working for, Mr. Cox had a strong tendency to show the D-VII and it's pilot in horrible, certain death situations. Here the Camel pilot pours lead directly into the unfortunate Luftstreitkrafte pilot while his stricken engine spews oil and smoke. Cavacraft pulled out all the stops on this model. When you open the lid, the first thing you see are the factory-built wings installed in the fuselage with the tail feathers in place. It is literally ready to assemble. Everything is sheeted but the wings, for which covering material is provided. All of the main balsa parts are pre-carved and finished, while the flat ones are die-cut. includes a die-cut plywood firewall, fully formed wire landing gear, completely finished wheels, hinge material, covering tissue for the wings and some hardware. This kit has not been started. NOTE: missing the plans/instructions and missing the decals, as well as the screws for mounting the engine of your choice (the engine was not included with the kit). I believe that the model is complete other than those things listed; this collector loved to remove the instructions and decals from his kits for 'safe keeping' but that location was never discovered. Please be aware that this is sold AS-IS as I cannot do a complete inventory as there are no instructions. Although I have not seen them, this box and art were clearly used for more than one kit. The only way to identify what is inside is by the ink stamp on the left and right sides of the box. The kit number "G-3" implies there may have been at least three kits, and one of them may have been a Sopwith Camel.

Comet Supermarine Spitfire II - 19.5 inch Wingspan Gas or Rubber Powered Wooden Aircraft Kit, 1620

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$42   

From the early 1970s. Large scale issue for rubber or gas free flight, or easily converted to RC using today's tiny and light servos and receivers. Box art is by Locher, who did a great deal of the Monogram box artwork also. Kit features traditional wood/tissue construction with all die cut parts, 'Tube-O-Matic' fuselage construction and 'Rugged Super X Simplified Non-Warping Wing' construction, colorful insignia, detailed full size plans, building instructions, wheels, hardware, tissue and propeller. The model has not been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions. Comet was a famous manufacturer of stick and tissue flying and static models. In the 1930s Great Depression, they lead the low-priced kit revolution with the "Dime Scale" kits and famous advertisements in Model Airplane News magazine and others. Comet reached it's peak in the 1930s when they acquired the services of Carl Goldberg. Goldberg was a highly accomplished modeler with articles in Model Airplane News and famous designs that won him several National level competitions in the 1930s and beyond. (Carl Goldberg went on to found his own company and produced well designed and popular free-flight and RC aircraft). Comet survived the post World War economic slump and continued kit production until they were bought out by long-time competitor Guillow's in 1998.

Guillows British SE-5 - Shelf Model Series - 7 Inch Wingspan, 25H-6

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$24   

This is one of the "Shelf Model" series by Guillow's and works out to roughly 1/46 scale. These early 1950s models were a new concept designed compete with the 'solid' scale models of the time. Instead of the usual tedious carving and sanding, Guillow's advertised on the box side that "The Die-Cut Parts Go Together Like Magic!" Features all die-cut parts on five sheets of balsa, wood stock as required, metal propeller, metal wire for the landing gear and comprehensive text step-by-step instructions, full size drawing, exploded drawing, cut out insignia and rudder flash, instrument panel and many more details. The wingspan is 7 inches. This is an all balsa kit and no tissue is needed. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and all paperwork.

Comet Supermarine Spitfire IX - 20 Inch Wingspan Flying Balsa Airplane Model, 3402

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$34   

1970s reissue of the older and still very popular kit. Features traditional wood/tissue construction, quality printwood, stripwood, wire prop shaft, fully formed and finished wood wheels and thrust button, clear canopy material, rubber, tissue, propeller and detailed full size plans with building instructions. The model has not been started. Inventoried 100% complete. Comet was a famous manufacturer of stick and tissue flying and static models. In the 1930s Great Depression, they lead the low-priced kit revolution with the "Dime Scale" kits and famous advertisements in Model Airplane News magazine and others. Comet reached it's peak in the 1930s when they acquired the services of Carl Goldberg. Goldberg was a highly accomplished modeler with articles in Model Airplane News and famous designs that won him several National level competitions in the 1930s and beyond. (Carl Goldberg went on to found his own company and produced well designed and popular free-flight and RC aircraft). Comet survived the post World War economic slump and continued kit production until they were bought out by long-time competitor Guillow's in 1998.

Marvel Douglas 8A-5 / A-33 Attack Bomber - Battle Planes Of America Series - Solid Wood Aircraft, 1/48

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair-

$37   

Rare solid model from 1942. At that time, their were 'fliers' and 'solids.' 'Fliers' were notoriously off-scale and lacked detail so they would fly well. 'Solids' were true scale models that were solid wood and designed only to be scale miniatures (they did not fly). This kit has a worn box missing the end flaps, but inside it is complete with all parts and full-size plans with instructions and a description of this rare aircraft. There are three sheets of printwood and a block for the fuselage. The model has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and plans present. Please note, this is war time model so compressed fibre-board has been substituted for balsa wood. Marvel Mfg. Company was located in Seaford, Long Island, New York and had an extensive line of solid aircraft, wooden ships, army tanks and more. Just as a small example, the following are advertised on the back of this larger-scale solid kit: Grumman JRF-2, Mariner PBM-1, Bell YFM-1, P-38, P-40, Baltimore, Ryan STM-2, Curtiss AT-9, Douglas A-20A, Republic Guardsman, Grumman Skyrocket and Douglas 8A-5.

Joe Ott Spitfire With Ott-O-Matic Formers - 22 Inch Wingspan Flying Wood Model, 2201

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$64   

Rare kit from the 1940s or very late 1930s. Every rarer in this condition - with a complete box and all contents never disturbed other than when I did the inventory. This is very unusual due to the age and their very fragile nature. This model is one of Joe Ott's mid-range line in size and price. It features glue in a metal tube, 2 sheets of the unique Ott-O-Matic formers on thick stock, factory-carved balsa wood propeller, thin hardwood wing ribs, factory-cut stripwood stock, a factory sealed paper envelope for the small parts (usually consists of fully carved thrust button, main wheels and metal prop shaft/rubber motor hook), clear material for windows, color insignia, covering tissue and excellent plans. The kit has never been started. The loose parts have been inventoried complete and the paper envelope is still factory sealed.

Guillows Messerschmitt Bf-109 - Scale Balsa Flying Airplane Model, 1/24, 505

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$32   

From about 1962. High quality stick-and-tissue flying flying model and one of Guillow's very popular series of WWII kits that sold well for decades. Features 16.5 inch wingspan, color decals, quality die-cut balsa wood, strip wood, plastic prop, vacuform cowling, spinner, radiator, exhaust, air scoop and other details, wood wheels, clear canopy (in fine condition, not yellowed), covering tissue and more. The full size plans are excellent and contain a significant amount of building instruction and guidance as well. This kit has not been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts, decals and instructions.

Hawk F8F Bearcat, 1/48, 87

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$38   

For the advanced Hawk collector. Solid wood, wartime scale kit from 1946. Features 3D cut and tapered fuselage, completely finished engine nacelle, very nicely factory-cut wings, horizontal & vertical stabilizers, fully finished wheels, metal seat, clear vacuform canopy (still clear, not yellowed), plastic propeller, wood stock as necessary, color decal sheet, and excellent Hawk full size plans. Never started and inventoried 100% complete. Hawk was one of the few manufacturers making wooden kits to a constant scale of 1/48 in the 1930s. Hawk kits were very complete and included plastic or metal details and superb quality drawings for the true scale enthusiast.

BMJR Models 1/2A Viking - 42 Inch Wingspan For .049-.051 Power, B-128

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$44   

Retails new for $66. An excellent kit featuring stick and tissue construction, laser cut wood parts, hardware, full size plans and detailed text instructions. The kit has never been started. The parts are still in the internal factory sealed bags and includes all paperwork.

Comet Grumman F6F Hellcat - 24 Inch Wingspan - Coca-Cola Bottle Issue, Y4-129

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$64   

Part of the deluxe high-cost Comet "Y" kit line from the 1950s. Note the box showing a bottle of Coke next to the young builder's snack tray and a finished aircraft. Large scale issue with the 'Coke Bottle' box design. For rubber flight or easily converted to RC using today's tiny and light servos and receivers. Kit features traditional wood/tissue construction, very high quality printwood, stripwood and spars, and other balsa stock as required, scale wood prop, completely preformed wood wheels, additional sheet with cut-out canopy frames, air intake and instrument panel, metal prop shaft, covering tissue and superb full size plans with instructions. The model has not been started. It has been inventoried complete. Comet was a famous manufacturer of stick and tissue flying and static models. In the 1930s Great Depression, they lead the low-priced kit revolution with the "Dime Scale" kits and famous advertisements in Model Airplane News magazine and others. Comet reached it's peak in the 1930s when they acquired the services of Carl Goldberg. Goldberg was a highly accomplished modeler with articles in Model Airplane News and famous designs that won him several National level competitions in the 1930s and beyond. (Carl Goldberg went on to found his own company and produced well designed and popular free-flight and RC aircraft). Comet survived the post World War economic slump and continued kit production until they were bought out by long-time competitor Guillow's in 1998.

Sterling Curtiss P-6E Hawk - 16 inch Wingspan Flying Model Aircraft that Drops Bombs in Flight, A10

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$75   

Excellent flying model from the early to mid 1960s that is designed for rubber free flight or control line. It includes an innovative system for dropping bombs in flight. Features stick and tissue construction, quality die-cut balsa parts, stripwood and spars, other wood stock as required, die-cut clear windshield, vac plastic details including radiator scoop, engine cowling, pilot bust, wheels pants, exhaust ports and more, finished wire landing gear struts, finished main and tail wheels, rubber motor, plastic prop, covering tissue and a big full color decal sheet. Includes excellent full size plans with detailed instructions. Never started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag; the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete. Sterling was a famous manufacturer dating back to the 1930/40s flying model craze. Although they continued to produce kits for decades after the flying model slump following World War II, they eventually fell victim to the general lack of interest in modeling that occurred in the early 1980s. I always considered Sterling's offering to be 'deluxe' compared to other manufacturers.

Guillows SE-5A Scout - 24 inch Wingspan for Free Flight or R/C Conversion, 202

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$42   

Large scale well detailed kit. Can be flown rubber free flight, gas free flight, or converted to electric RC using today's small and light servos and receivers. Well detailed with scale plastic wheels, plastic propeller, vacuform nose/cowl and engine, full color decals, tissue, die cut balsa parts, rubber motor, plywood firewall and excellent full size plans. The model has not been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts, decals and instructions. Guillow's founder, Paul K. Guillow, was a WWI naval aviator. In 1926 he began producing wooden model airplane kits. His 'Shelf Models' were some of the earlier non-flying models in production. Guillow's grew during the model boom of the 1930s, and when the Depression hit the hardest, Guillow's responded with lower prices and became one of the low price leaders, frequently advertising in Model Airplane News and other leading publications. During the war, like most manufacturers, Guillow's was forced to alternative materials such as cardboard and pine. Guillow's survived the post WWII slump by creating many inexpensive profile flying rubber powered aircraft and gliders in the 1950s (along with North Pacific) which became famous - some are still available today. The stick and tissue lines have been updated with laser cut parts and are still in production as of 2009.

Enterprise F4U-5 Corsair - Static Or .039 to .074 Gas Engine Flying Model - 17.5 Inch Wingspan, 147-125

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$125   

Rare, highly prefabricated model from 1955 and even rarer in never started & complete condition. Enterprise pulled out all the stops on this design to make it easy to build and to give a realistic appearance - so good that you can make a static model from it to be proud of. However, it is designed for U-Control operation on the engines listed and has a wing area of 50 sq. inches, length of 14.75 inches and a wingspan of 17.5. The kit is almost completely sheeted - there are only two very short section of tissue paper needed. Features die-cut wooden parts, fuselage that is side sheeted and has factory-carved upper and lower front sections, a beautiful factory-carved wing with the correct airfoil and notched at the gull wing lines, die-cut horizontal and vertical stabilizer with elevators, hinge material, plywood landing gear mounts, fully formed wire gear struts, finished main and tail wheels, a bag of metal hardware, plastic cowling and pilot's bust, clear vacuform canopy that is still in mint condition and perfectly clear (not yellowed), covering tissue, a beautiful set of full color decals (still in amazing 'near mint' condition), covering tissue and superbly illustrated assembly instructions in 'excellent++' condition. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes all paperwork. Please NOTE that while there is no assembly, the die-cut balsa parts have been very neatly removed from the sheet by an adult.

Maircraft Curtiss P-40 - Solid Wood Model Airplane, 1/48, S13

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good++

$25   

Maircraft was originally founded in the early or mid 1930s by Gordon Christoph and went by the name Aircraft Model Company. The company produced a typical line of solid 'profile cut' kits that required the usual high talent levels for carving and finishing. A former Comet Model Airplane & Supply Co. salesman, Jack Mair, bought the company in the early 1940s and renamed it Maircraft. This company was one of the handful of solid kit producers who issued models in a consistent 1/48 scale during the 1930s and 1940s (others included Hawk and Dyna-Model). This lead to one of the most desirable and rare model kits ever produced in the USA - the wood/plastic 1/48 United DC-3 model issued immediately after World War 2. Other than the P-61 and a few other Maircraft offerings, most were simple kits that sold for the low price of about 35 cents and gave the owners many hours of pleasurable work. This kit features a full size plan with instructions steps, fuselage that is about 80% cut in the x,y and z axis, profile cut parts, printwood and a small bag of details. The model has not been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and the larger parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete with all paperwork. Please note, the insignia for this kit is Chinese markings only.

Maircraft Heinkel He-100 Fighter - Solid Wood Model Airplane, 1/48, S6

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc+

$28   

Maircraft was originally founded in the early or mid 1930s by Gordon Christoph and went by the name Aircraft Model Company. The company produced a typical line of solid 'profile cut' kits that required the usual high talent levels for carving and finishing. A former Comet Model Airplane & Supply Co. salesman, Jack Mair, bought the company in the early 1940s and renamed it Maircraft. This company was one of the handful of solid kit producers who issued models in a consistent 1/48 scale during the 1930s and 1940s (others included Hawk and Dyna-Model). This lead to one of the most desirable and rare model kits ever produced in the USA - the wood/plastic 1/48 United DC-3 model issued immediately after World War 2. Other than the P-61 and a few other Maircraft offerings, most were simple kits that sold for the low price of about 35 cents and gave the owners many hours of pleasurable work. This kit features a full size plan with instructions steps, fuselage that is about 80% cut, profile cut parts, printwood and a small bag of details. The model has not been started. The parts are either in factory sealed bag(s) or inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions.

California Model Co SE-5a Scout and Nieuport 17 C-1 Wood Flying Airplanes, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$18   

NOTE: builder kits only, please read carefully. Includes the important parts from both kits. Probably from the 1940s. Includes full size plans/instructions and all required printwood. They have never been started but include no parts other than stripwood and plans. From Bill Baker Jr - "California Model Company originated in Long Beach, Calif in the late 1940's or early 1950's. My grandparents, William (Bill) Loyal Baker and his wife, Ruth (Tripp) Baker were the founders. The company started out as primarily balsa based model aircraft but later, in the late 50's or early 60's, branched into the model RR craft kits and Cub Scout craft kits. They even had a balsa speed boat kit powered by a model airplane gas engine adapted to fit. When they retired, around 1968 or 1969, they sold the business and the "shop" in North Long Beach they built to house their business. I have many fond memories as a young child "working" with them in the shop, assembling kits. I have a few unbuilt kits today!"

Guillows DeHavilland Mosquito Mk.IV - 25.75 Inch Wingspan U-Control or Static Display, 1/27, 804

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Sealed Exc

$195   

Still factory sealed. Very rare and out-of-production model from 1976. This large-scale stick-and-tissue flying model is designed for twin .020 to .049 engine gas engines and U-Control. Features many sheets of high quality, die-cut printwood, die-cut plylwood, stripwood and spars, scale plastic wheels, nacelles, spinners, wing tips, landing gear and much more, clear canopy and nose blister, U-control handle and hardware, covering tissue, full color decals and superb, full size plans.

Ray Hawker Typhoon, 1/43

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$26   

Rare kit, probably from the late 1940s but the actual date is not known. Large scale model that is solid wood. Features 'Ray-Ring' fuselage, a novel and useful feature to make fuselage finishing easier. Instead of using template to shape the fuselage, the templates have already been used and at those locations the fuselage is already carved to final shape! You simply carve in between the pre-carved section until they match - a very nice idea. Also includes factory cut wings, fully finished wheels, clear vacuform canopy (known as the 'Ray-Closure') in excellent condition and not yellowed, very high quality printwood, full color insignia, very nice full size plans including building instructions. The kit has never been started and is complete. Ray Aircraft Products Co. was located in West Chester Pennsylvania. They mention this is the '5nd of the RAY SOLID MODELS'. The Hellcat was #2. Little else is known.

Comet Mitsubishi Zero A6M5 Super Stars Series - 21 inch Wingspan Flying Model Airplane, 1622

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$38   

From the early to mid 1970s. Large scale issue for rubber or gas free flight, or easily converted to RC using today's tiny and light servos and receivers. Box art is by Locher, who did a great deal of the Monogram box artwork also. Kit features traditional wood/tissue construction with all die cut parts, 'Tube-O-Matic' fuselage construction and 'Rugged Super X Simplified Non-Warping Wing' construction, die-cut printwood, factory cut leading & trailing edges and stripwood, colorful insignia, detailed full size plans with building instructions, full formed main and tail wheels, hardware, covering tissue and propeller. The model has not been started. The smallest parts are still in the factory sealed clear bag; the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete and includes instructions and insignia sheet. Please NOTE that the free knife advertised on the box top is not present. Comet was a famous manufacturer of stick and tissue flying and static models. In the 1930s Great Depression, they lead the low-priced kit revolution with the "Dime Scale" kits and famous advertisements in Model Airplane News magazine and others. Comet reached it's peak in the 1930s when they acquired the services of Carl Goldberg. Goldberg was a highly accomplished modeler with articles in Model Airplane News and famous designs that won him several National level competitions in the 1930s and beyond. (Carl Goldberg went on to found his own company and produced well designed and popular free-flight and RC aircraft). Comet survived the post World War economic slump and continued kit production until they were bought out by long-time competitor Guillow's in 1998.

Joe Ott North American Mustang P-51B - Ott-O-Former - 40 Inch Wingspan, 4001

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$225   

From the mid-1940s and very rare, especially in this condition.. The Joe Ott designed 'Ott-O-Former' series was the height of the classic stick and tissue flying model kits not just in box art but in contents. The large wingpspan kits were the top of the Joe Ott line and had a price tag to match, which makes them harder to find today, since fewer were produced. In a time when most kits came only with white tissue, printed wood and plans, the Bilt-A-Set line box came chock full of parts and features like beautifully printed Ott-O-Formers to speed up fuselage construction, Ott-O-Fromer assembly jigs and other parts as well, high-quality full length spars and strip wood, light-weight hardwood wing ribs, plywood propeller, fully carved and finished main and tail wheels, metal propeller/rubber shaft, propeller bearings, clear windscreen material, two colors of covering tissue, color printed national markings, pilot bust and squadron insignia, fully illustrated instructions and more. There is even a tube of very colorful Jo Ott Model Airplane Cement included (never opened, but dried up). This kit has never been started and is like it left the factory. The spars and stringers are still held together with the factory adhesive paper. All small parts are still in the factory small paper bag. The parts are still all in the sheets; none have been punched out. 100% complete with all parts and the plans in 'very good++' condition. The box top had several split corners and short tears and I have repaired them all correctly from the inside with cardstock and book binding glue.

Sours: https://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?g=flying-balsa-model-kits&mat=balsa
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