Snail trail quilts

Snail trail quilts DEFAULT

Block 2019: Snail Trail Variations

Welcome to the Block 2019 Creative Challenge! We’re exploring different classic quilt block each month all year long. Before we get to the Snail Trail variations, we want to be sure you get to see the Block 2019 Sampler Quilt!

It’s 72″ x 72″ and suitable for quilt-as-you-go. Get fabric requirements for the sampler or look at the kit. It’s another fun way to participate in Block 2019. Okay, back to Snail Trail variations!

Last week we met Snail Trail. This week, we’re going to play with variations of Snail Trail and learn along the way what essential parts from Snail Trail must exist in its variations. Let’s start by look at the original.

Snail Trail quilt block

Our Snail Trail is actually four blocks put together. Here’s a solo Snail Trail block.

According to Barbara Brackman in Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns, the traditional Snail Trail block traces back to the Ladies Art Company, a mail order quilt pattern catalog, appearing in 1928. The block predates its publication in LAC, as you’ll notice when we look at the variations. The block features a Four Patch set at the center of several Square in a Squares creating the illusion of curves. There are definitely a few avenues for variations. Let’s take a look.

Simple Monkey Wrench

snail trail block variations

A Monkey Wrench block is very similar to Snail Trail, but it has one less Square in a Square round on it. Because of this, the illusion of the curve isn’t so dramatic in Monkey Wrench blocks. This one is simplified even more by being made with only one Square in a Square unit, the rest is created using squares and Half Square Triangle units. This is nice for fast sewing, and it’s also a great opportunity to create a scrappy, mosaic look. Just be sure to sort the scraps into two contrasting values and you’re set!

Nautilus

snail trail block variations

Nautilus was published by Clara Stone in her booklet, Practical Needlework: Quilt Patterns, CW in 1906. This variation has all the same elements as Snail Trail, except that the Four Patch at the center is replaced by a Quarter Square Triangle unit.

Vortex

snail trail block variations

Two of the fun things to do with Snail Trail is to create a swirl of all different colors, and to keep adding rounds of Square in a Squares. Vortex has both. If you want to make this one, the easiest way is to start with a piece of paper the size of block you want, and start drawing Square in a Squares on the paper until you like it and/or run out of room. Use the paper to Foundation Paper Piece the block.

Snail Garden

snail trail block variations

One of my favorite things to do for Snail Trail blocks is to sneak another block into it. That’s what I’ve done with Snail Garden. By it’s lonesome, it’s a little odd looking, but set a bunch together and voila! A garden of Pinwheel flowers appears.

snail trail block variationssnail trail block variations

In a quilt, I like mixing solids and prints to help the Snail Trail and Pinwheel elements contrast.

Ready to make your own variation on Snail Trail variation? We have instructions for Snail Garden to get you started, but there are many ways reinterpret Snail Trail your way!

snail trail block variation

Check back next week, April 17th, for quilt-as-you-go ideas for quilting your Snail Trail block.

Show us your Snail Trail blocks and variations in the AQS Project Parade Facebook group, or use the hashtag #Block2019 and tag us @aqsonline because we can’t wait to see what you make!

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Sours: http://www.aqsblog.com/block-2019-snail-trail-variations

Hello again, this is Amanda from Larkspur Quilts! Are you ready for a fun and colorful summer project?

Quilting Tutorial Supplies

This free Snail's Trail quilt block pattern uses the 8” Finished GO! Snail’s Trail Die, 8” GO! Qube Mix & Match, and the 8” GO! Qube Companion Set-Angles.

The Snail’s Trail pattern is a Block on Board, and I used the triangle in a square shape to continue the lines, so they look like distinct shapes.

This quilt finishes at 70” x 59”.

 

Dies Used

              -Triangle in Square-Center-4” Finished square (55753) (Shape #13)

              -Triangle in Square-Sides-4” Finished Square (55754) (Shape #14)

 

Fabric Directions

  • Black fabric (4 yards total) I used some solids and some tonal fabrics that I had.
  1.   Cut four 5” strips the width of fabric.
  2.   Sub-cut 30 of Shape #1- 4” finished squares.
  3.   Cut two yards of fabric into eight 5” strips the length of fabric.
  4.   Use the Cut & Shift method to sub-cut 98 of Shape #13 Triangle in Square-Centers.
  5.   Cut three 3-1/4” strips the width of fabric.
  6.   Sub-cut 18 sets of Shape #14 Triangle in Square-Sides.

 

  1.   Cut five 3-1/4” strips the width of fabric.
  2.   Sub-cut 40 sets Shape #14 Triangle in Square-Sides.
  3.   Cut five 10” strips the width of fabric.
  4.   Sub-cut forty sets of Snail’s Trail pieces shapes A-E.

  • Colorful pack of 10” squares** (you will need at least two squares per color)

    **I used the Create-Layer Cake by Quiet Play for Riley Blake

  1.   Sort pack and choose one 10” square from 20 different colors of fabric.
  2.   Sub-cut 40 sets of Snail’s Trail pieces - Shapes A-E. You should have two of each shape A-E in every color (see picture below).
  3. From the second 10” square, the same colors that you cut the snail’s trail pieces, cut two sets of Shape #14 Triangle in Square-Sides. When you do this, cutone set with fabric face up, and one set with fabric face down.

Snail's Trail Fabric Shapes Cut Out

 

  • Binding: ½ yard black and white striped fabric cut into six strips using the 2-1/2” strip cutter.

  • Batting: 78” x 67”

  • Backing: 82” x 71”

Snail's Trail Quilt Block Design

 

Free Snail’s Trail Block Pattern

Sew Snail’s Trail blocks according to die instructions. Make 20 Snail’s Trail blocks.

1.  Layout your blocks on a design wall or a flat surface with about 5” of space in between for the sashing. If you are like me and space is a precious commodity in your sewing area, I just worked on 1-2 rows at a time.

2.  I took every other Snail’s Trail block and rotated it 90 degrees for variety.


Snail's Trail Quilt Block Design Swirls in a Row

 

3.  Lay out the triangle in square-centers, and then match the Triangle in Square-Sides with the corresponding colors of the Snail’s Trail blocks. Also, notice the 4-1/2” squares as part of the sashing.

 

Snail's Trail Quilt Block Laid Out

 

4.  For the top and the sides of the quilt you will use the black Triangle in Square sides on the edge.

 

Triangle in a Square Layout

 

5.  I sewed the blocks together in a 4 x 5 layout, with the sashing, and then added a 4-1/2 black border cut with the 4-1/2” strip cutter die.

 

Final Swirl Pattern Layout

 

6.  I added squares in the corners that I fussy cut from the extra squares in this layer cake, and black and white thin striped binding.

 

IMG-8074

 

You could customize this project with a name or a phrase. Maybe…"You’re Getting Very Sleepy"?

I hope that you enjoy making this quilt! If you do make this quilt, please share the photo on social media using the hashtag #AccuQuilt and don't forget to tag @larkspurquilts and @AccuQuilt so we can see your fun creation!

Sours: https://blog.accuquilt.com/free-snails-trail-quilt-pattern
  1. Free holiday stationery borders
  2. Ebay house plans
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Snail's Trail Quilt Block Pattern

The Snail's Trail Quilt Pattern

The snail's trail is a popular quilt pattern that has a modern flair and tons of movement. It's a fun project and a bit of a challenge. Each block has a spiral pattern that can be a little tricky to construct, but once you get the hang of it, each subsequent block is easier.

This version is sewn in a neutral theme, but the quilt can be constructed with any fabrics you choose. Don't hesitate to add extra colors or to make a scrap quilt with the pattern.

Quilt Size and Blocks

As written, the size of the snail's trail quilt pattern is 70 inches by 77 inches.

One of the components is measured in sixteenths of an inch—not a size that can be rotary cut with absolute accuracy. The patches are not difficult to estimate, and estimates will work just fine. However, you can also download an optional cutting guide to tape to a rotary ruler.

Snail's trail quilt blocks can also be foundation pieced. That can be a good option for miniature quilt blocks but is probably not worth the trouble for the 9-inch version in this quilt pattern.

Materials Needed

Light Neutral and Darker Neutral for Quilt Blocks: 2 yards of each fabric

Straight-Set Borders

  • Dark Inner Border: 5/8 yard
  • Outer Border: 1 1/4 yard

The outer border illustrated is the same fabric used in quilt blocks. Change this if you wish.

Other Materials

  • Backing: 4 1/2 yards 
  • Batting: About 80 inches by 87 inches
  • Binding: About 315 running inches of double fold binding

Cutting the Blocks

As with any quilt, start by making a sample block before you cut all the patches needed for the quilt.

Cut from each of your two contrasting fabrics:

  • Three 1 5/8-inch wide strips, cut from selvage to selvage
  • One 1 5/8- by 16-inch strip
  • Three 2 1/2-inch wide strips cut from selvage to selvage; cut (42) 2 1/2-inch squares from these strips
  • Three 3 1/8-inch wide strips cut from selvage to selvage; cut (42) 3 1/8-inch squares from these strips
  • Four 4 1/16-inch wide strips cut from selvage to selvage; cut (42) 4 1/16-inch squares from these strips (estimate the size or use an optional cutting guide)
  • Six 5 3/8-inch wide strips cut from selvage to selvage; cut (42) 5 3/8-inch squares from these strips (you might need an additional cut if the fabric is narrower than normal)

You may need to cut a few squares from remaining fabric to reach a total of 42 for each size and color.

Cut each square in half once diagonally.

Make the Quilt Blocks

Make Four-Patch Block Centers

Refer to the diagram as you assemble the quilt block.

  1. Sew a 1 5/8- by 42-inch light strip lengthwise to a dark strip of the same size. Press the seam allowance towards the dark strip.
  2. Square up one end of the strip set and cut (25) 1 5/8-inch segments.
  3. Combine remaining like-sized 1 5/8-inch wide strips to make a total of 84 segments.
  4. Make a four-patch unit by sewing two segments together, placing like colors diagonally from each other. Press. If the patches are bulky, try fanning out the seam allowances when you press.

Make 42 four-patch units total.

Finish Assembling the Snail's Trail Quilt Block

The triangles increase in size around the center. Speed up assembly by chain piecing one triangle position at a time once you've become accustomed to the sewing order.

Fold triangles in half to find the midpoint along their longest edge. Match the midpoint to the midpoint of the patchwork it is matched to.

  1. Sew a light triangle cut from 2 1/2-inch squares to opposite sides of the four-patch center, orienting it as shown. Press seam allowances towards triangles.
  2. Add dark triangles of the same size to the remaining four-patch edges. Press.
  3. Continue adding triangles in pairs around the block, working from smaller to larger triangles and referring to the diagram for placement.
  4. Your block should measure 9 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches. If it doesn't, press and remeasure. If it still isn't quite right, inspect the block, looking for inconsistencies in sewing. Adjust for the next block.

Make a total of 42 snail's trail quilt blocks.

Assemble the Quilt

  1. Assemble the snail's trail quilt by placing the blocks in seven horizontal rows. Each row contains six quilt blocks as shown. Use the diagram to help you align the blocks to create a larger "O" of like colors where the quilt blocks join.
  2. Sew blocks in each row together. Press the seams between blocks in opposite directions from row to row and join the rows, matching all seams carefully. Press the quilt.
  3. Add straight borders to the quilt. Make the inner border from 3 1/2-inch wide strips cut from dark border fabric. Make the outer border from 5 1/2-inch wide strips. Use the straight border instructions to construct the borders and sew them to the quilt. Don't be tempted to make borders that match the measurements along the sides of your quilt—the edges are likely skewed a bit.
  4. Press the quilt and mark for quilting if necessary. Sandwich the quilt with batting and backing. Quilt by hand or machine. Trim excess batting and backing and square edges slightly if necessary. Sew binding strips around the quilt edges.
Sours: https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/snails-trail-quilt-pattern-2821851
Snail’s Trail Quilt with Free Pattern - S7E2 Midnight Quilt Show with Angela Walters

Block 2019: Snail Trail

Snail Trail quilt block

Welcome to Block 2019! We’re exploring classic quilt blocks all year, and the fourth block is Snail Trail. Part of the challenge of Block 2019 is to try different techniques and construction methods to grow and hone our skills as quilters. This month’s block can be made a few different ways, and it’s up to you to decide what you’d like to use.

Construction Choices

The first method is rotary cutting and piecing with sizing throughout. This method uses the most common skills but requires a little extra attention to maintaining points because the math for the block has been simplified. The instructions below are for this method except for where noted otherwise.

The second method is Foundation Paper Piecing. We are providing paper piecing patterns for this block. This method is helpful on blocks like Snail Trail that have more complicated math. We have videos explaining how to Foundation Paper Piece down in the FPP section along with the downloadable pattern.

The third method is template cutting. Before rotary cutters, everyone template cut. I still have treasured block templates my great-grandmother cut out from cereal boxes. It’s how newspapers like the Kansas City Star shared quilt block patterns. The only downside is the extra steps added to the cutting process. To template cut, use the FPP pattern and trace the unique shapes in the block (4 different sized triangles and a square) onto a piece of thin template plastic or sturdy cardboard. Add a quarter inch around the traced shape and cut out your template. Trace around the template onto your fabric and cut out. Sew as instructed below, ignoring any steps to cut up squares.

Finally, you’ll see there are four Snail Trail blocks within the block for this month. This means you can make all four using your preferred method, but it also means you can experiment and play around with different cutting and piecing methods. Have fun with it and find what works for you.

Fabric Requirements:

Gray(Includes quilt-as-you-go backing)  — 3/8 yard
Aqua — Fat Eighth
Dark Blue — Fat Eighth
Coral — Fat Eighth
Batting — 12″ x 12″ (For quilt-as-you-go method only)

Cutting Instructions:

From the gray fabric, cut:
(1) 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ (For the quilt-as-you-go method only, do not cut otherwise.)
(6) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″
(6) 2 3/4″ x 2 3/4″
(8) 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″

From the aqua fabric, cut:
(2) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″
(2) 2 3/4″ x 2 3/4″
(2) 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″

From the dark teal fabric, cut:
(3) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″
(3) 2 3/4″ x 2 3/4″
(4) 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″

From the coral fabric, cut:
(2) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″
(2) 2 3/4″ x 2 3/4″
(2) 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″

Cutting Guide:

snail trail block

Assembly:

If Foundation Paper Piecing

Download the FPP pattern by clicking here and print. Remember to measure the 1″ guide for accuracy in printing.

The cutting instructions above are large enough for FPP, but you can cut the pieces larger to fit your comfort level.

Make the Four Patches for the centers by following the instructions below. Then secure the Four Patches in the center of their respective patterns and begin to paper piece the rounds in numerical order. The dark gray is equal to dark teal, the light gray to aqua or coral, and white to the background/gray.

Make 2 dark teal/aqua 6 1/2″ blocks and 2 dark teal/coral 6 1/2″ blocks. You can remove the paper from the four blocks before sewing them together following the Block Assembly instructions.

To watch a video on how to Foundation Paper Piece, click here.

Four Patch

Sew a gray 1 1/4″ square to a dark teal 1 1/4″ square. Make 4.
Repeat with gray and aqua squares. Make 2.
Repeat with gray and coral squares. Make 2.
Sew units together to make (2) dark teal/aqua Four Patches and (2) dark teal/coral Four Patches. Four Patches measure 2″ x 2″ unfinished.

snail trail block

Round 1 (Square in a Square)

Take (2) gray 2 3/4″ squares and cut them in half diagonally twice. Repeat for (1) aqua square, (1) dark teal square, and (1) coral square.
Sew a gray triangle to the dark teal/aqua Four Patch oriented as shown below. Trim the ends even to the Four Patch. Make 2.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for the dark teal/coral Four Patch. Make 2.
Sew a dark teal triangle and an aqua triangle to the dark teal/aqua centers, as shown below.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for with a dark teal and coral triangle to the dark teal/coral centers.
Trim the blocks to 2 5/8″ x 2 5/8″ unfinished.

Round 2

Take (4) gray 2 3/4″ squares and cut them in half diagonally once. Repeat for (2) dark teal squares, (1) aqua square, and (1) coral square.
Sew a gray triangle to the dark teal/aqua center oriented as shown below. Trim the ends even to the center. Make 2.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for the dark teal/coral center. Make 2.
Sew a dark teal triangle and an aqua triangle to the dark teal/aqua centers, as shown below.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for with a dark teal and coral triangle to the dark teal/coral centers.
Trim the blocks to 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ unfinished.

Round 3

Take (2) gray 4 1/2″ squares and cut them in half diagonally twice. Repeat for (1) dark teal squares, (1) aqua square, and (1) coral square.
Sew a gray triangle to the dark teal/aqua center oriented as shown below. Trim the ends even to the center. Make 2.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for the dark teal/coral center. Make 2.
Sew a dark teal triangle and an aqua triangle to the dark teal/aqua centers, as shown below.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for with a dark teal and coral triangle to the dark teal/coral centers.
Trim the blocks to 4 3/4″ x 4 3/4″ unfinished.

Round 4

Take (4) gray 4 1/2″ squares and cut them in half diagonally once. Repeat for (2) dark teal squares, (1) aqua square, and (1) coral square.
Sew a gray triangle to the dark teal/aqua center oriented as shown below. Trim the ends even to the center. Make 2.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for the dark teal/coral center. Make 2.
Sew a dark teal triangle and an aqua triangle to the dark teal/aqua centers, as shown below.

snail trail block
Repeat in the same manner for with a dark teal and coral triangle to the dark teal/coral centers.

snail trail block

Trim the blocks to 6 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ unfinished for (2) dark teal/aqua blocks and (2) dark teal/coral blocks.

Block Assembly

Orient the dark teal/aqua and dark teal/coral blocks as shown below and sew together  in pairs and sew the pairs together to make the Snail Trail block. Block measures 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ unfinished.

Snail Trail quilt block
To prepare the block for quilt-as-you-go, sandwich the 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ backing square, 12″ x 12″ batting centered on the backing square, and your block. Baste using preferred method. Quilt as desired inside the 12″ finished size of the block.

Check back later in the month, when we’ll share ideas for quilting the block.

A quick tip…

Remember to sew to the inside of the Square in a Square points, not over the peak of the point.

If you used the Foundation Paper Piecing method, try removing the paper before sewing the four blocks together into one block. This makes it easier to manipulate the fabric and get sharp points.

Finally, try glue basting the points of the square in a square where the four blocks come together.

And you’re all set!

Check back next week for some fun variations on the Snail Trail block. You can always find links to all the Block 2019 posts and see when the next installment is coming out in the main Block 2019 article, just click here.

As you finish your blocks, share them in the AQS Project Parade Facebook group, or use the hashtag #Block2019 and tag us @aqsonline because we can’t wait to see what you do!

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Sours: http://www.aqsblog.com/block-2019-snail-trail

Quilts snail trail

Snail's Trail Quilt Block

Download this Project

Materials

  • Cream print and blue print scraps

Finished block: 12" square

Cut the Fabrics

From cream print, cut:

  • 1-6-7⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 extra-large triangles
  • 1-5-1⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 large triangles
  • 1-3-7⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 medium triangles
  • 1-3" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 small triangles
  • 2-2" squares

From blue print, cut:

  • 1-6-7⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 extra-large triangles
  • 1-5-1⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 large triangles
  • 1-3-7⁄8" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 medium triangles
  • 1-3" square, cutting it in half diagonally for a total of 2 small triangles
  • 2-2" squares

Assemble the Block

1. Sew together two cream print 2" squares and two blue print 2" squares in pairs (Diagram 1). Press the seam allowances toward the blue squares. Then join the pairs to make a Four-Patch unit. Press the seam allowance in one direction. The pieced Four-Patch unit should measure 3-1⁄2" square, including the seam allowances.

2. Sew a blue print small triangle to opposite edges of the Four Patch unit. Press the seam allowances toward the blue triangles. (Note: Before sewing the triangles to the Four-Patch unit, be sure to correctly position the pieces. The outside corners of the triangles will extend slightly beyond the outside edges of the Four-Patch unit.)

3. Join the two cream print small triangles to the remaining edges of the Four-Patch unit. Press the seam allowances toward the cream triangles.

4. In the same manner, continue to add the blue print and cream print triangles to the Four-Patch unit, working from the smallest triangles to the largest triangles (Diagram 2), until you've completed the block (Block Assembly Diagram). Always press the seam allowances toward the outside of the block.

Sours: https://www.allpeoplequilt.com/quilt-patterns/quilt-blocks/snails-trail-quilt-block
Snail’s Trail Quilt with Free Pattern - S7E2 Midnight Quilt Show with Angela Walters

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