Depakote classification

Depakote classification DEFAULT

Depakote (divalproex sodium) for Bipolar Disorder

What is Depakote?
Depakote is a medication known as an anticonvulsant that is used to treat the manic symptoms of bipolar disorder. It is also used to treat seizures and prevent migraine headaches.


When did the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approve the medication?
Depakote was first approved by the FDA in 1996.


Is there a generic version of Depakote?
Yes, the generic version is known as divalproex sodium and is sold in the U.S.


Are there any major differences between Depakote and other antipsychotics used to treat bipolar disorder?
Depakote belongs to the class of medications known as anticonvulsants. Anticonvulsants are sometimes taken to treat the manic episodes associated with bipolar disorder. Depakote is sometimes prescribed when patients experience rapid cycling of mood episodes and works by calming the hyperactivity of the brain during mania.

Article continues below

Concerned about Bipolar Disorder?

Take our 2-minute Bipolar quiz to see if you or a loved one may benefit from further diagnosis and treatment.

Take Bipolar Quiz

Can children take Depakote?
Children under the age of two are at higher risk for liver damage when taking the medication. Talk to your child’s doctor about the risks of using the medication.


Are there potential interaction issues for people taking Depakote and any other drugs?
There are hundreds of drugs which are known to interact with Depakote in major, moderate, or mild ways, so let your doctor know what other medications you are taking before you begin taking the medication. Some of these include hepatic enzyme-inducing drugs, aspirin, carbapenem antibiotics, diazepam, ethosuximide, lamotrigine, phenytoin, amitriptyline, nortriptyline, warfarin, zidovudine, and topiramate.


Are there any other medical conditions that would make someone ineligible for Depakote therapy?
Talk to your doctor about other medical conditions before you take Depakote. Persons with liver disease, mitochondrial disease, and urea cycle disorders are typically advised not to take Depakote.


What is the typical dose that would be prescribed to someone taking Depakote?
The FDA recommends that dosage for treating mania begin at 750 mg daily. The maximum recommended dosage is 60mg/kg per day.


What do I do if I miss a dose?
Take the dose of Depakote when you remember, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. You should never take extra doses of the medication to make up for missed doses.


What side effects can Depakote cause?
The side effects of Depakote can include:
• headaches
• sleepiness
• nausea
• tremors
• fatigue
• vomiting
• dizziness
• blurred vision
• stomach pain
• diarrhea
• weight gain
• hair loss
• coordination problems

It also is recommended that you wait to drive or operate machinery until you know how the medication affects you. It is also recommended that people avoid alcohol and illegal drugs while on the medication, as they can worsen adverse effects. Report major side effects to your doctor immediately, which can include red or purple spots on skin, swelling or pain in joints, bruising, drowsiness, vomiting, change in mental status, drop in body temperature, fever, rash, hives, mouth sores, peelings of skin, swelling of face, and trouble swallowing or breathing. You can also report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online.


What are the potential psychological side effects of taking Depakote?
Depakote causes suicidal thoughts in a small percentage of people who take the medication. Seek medical help if you experience these thoughts or other changes in your behavior or mood.


What are the potential long-term effects of taking Depakote?
Depakote can cause liver damage, and the risk is more likely to occur during the first 6 months of taking the medication. Signs might include nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, dark-colored urine, facial swelling, and yellowing of the skin or white of eyes. Cases of pancreatitis among children and adults taking the medication have also been reported.


Is it safe for a woman who is pregnant, about to become pregnant, or nursing to take Depakote?
Depakote can cause birth defects and fetal harm when taken during pregnancy. The drug can be transferred via breast milk and potentially harm a baby. Therefore, talk to your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are nursing before you take Depakote.


Can symptoms occur if Depakote is discontinued?
It’s important not to discontinue use of the drug before talking with your doctor. Withdrawal symptoms of Depakote can include irritability, anxiety, the return of manic or depressive symptoms, dizziness, and tremors.


What should I do if I overdose on Depakote?
An overdose of Depakote could be fatal, so seek immediate help or call the Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222 if you overdose. Overdose symptoms can include irregular heartbeat, sleepiness, and loss of consciousness resulting in a coma.


Is Depakote habit-forming?
Depakote has no habit-forming potential, but it is not recommended that you discontinue use of the drug before talking with your doctor, as withdrawal symptoms can occur.


How much does Depakote cost?
According to goodrx.com, 60 tables of 500 mg divalproex sodium cost approximately $170.


Are there any disadvantages to Depakote?
The biggest disadvantages of Depakote are potential side effects which include possible liver damage or pancreatitis. Pregnant women are also typically advised not to take the medication due to the risk of birth defects.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained herein should NOT be used as a substitute for the advice of an appropriately qualified and licensed physician or other health care provider. This article mentions drugs that were FDA-approved and available at the time of publication and may not include all possible drug interactions or all FDA warnings or alerts. The author of this page explicitly does not endorse this drug or any specific treatment method. If you have health questions or concerns about interactions, please check with your physician or go to the FDA site for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Last Updated: Aug 6, 2018
Sours: https://www.psycom.net/bipolar-medications-depakote-divalproex-sodium/

Migraine and headache:

Indications for: DEPAKOTE

Prophylaxis of migraine headaches.

Adult Dosage:

Initially 250mg twice daily; usual max 1g/day. Elderly: reduce initial dose and titrate slowly; monitor. Concomitant rufinamide: initiate at a low dose and titrate; see full labeling.

Children Dosage:

DEPAKOTE Contraindications:

Hepatic disease or significant hepatic dysfunction. Known mitochondrial disorders caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG). Suspected POLG-related disorder in children <2yrs of age. Urea cycle disorders. Migraine prophylaxis in pregnant women and women of childbearing potential not using effective contraception.

Boxed Warning:

Life-threatening adverse reactions (eg, hepatotoxicity, fetal risk, pancreatitis).

DEPAKOTE Warnings/Precautions:

Increased risk of hepatotoxicity in patients with congenital metabolic disorders, multiple AEDs, severe seizure disorders with mental retardation, organic brain disorders, mitochrondrial disorders, esp. in children <2yrs of age. Increased risk of major congenital malformations (eg, spina bifida), decreased IQ scores, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Discontinue if hepatic dysfunction, pancreatitis, thrombocytopenia, hyperammonemia, hypothermia, or multi-organ hypersensitivity reactions occur. History of liver disease; monitor liver function and clinical symptoms prior to therapy and at frequent intervals (esp. for 1st 6 mos). Follow-up if symptoms of hyperammonemia occur. Suicidal tendencies (monitor). Depakote ER is not bioequivalent to delayed-release tabs on mg/mg basis. Avoid abrupt cessation. Monitor platelets, bleeding time (at baseline, before surgery, and in pregnancy); reevaluate periodically. May affect HIV or CMV viral load (in vitro). Monitor motor and cognitive functions routinely. Elderly (monitor fluid and nutritional intake, and for somnolence). Advise females of childbearing potential of risks to fetus. Nursing mothers: monitor infants.

DEPAKOTE Classification:

DEPAKOTE Interactions:

Monitor levels of valproate, ethosuximide, other anticonvulsants, and whenever an enzyme inducer is added or withdrawn. Potentiates carbamazepine, diazepam, ethosuximide, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, tolbutamide, warfarin, zidovudine, amitriptyline, nortriptyline, propofol, rufinamide. Potentiated by aspirin, felbamate. Efficacy reduced by rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, carbapenems, estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives; monitor serum valproate concentrations. CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants. Clonazepam may induce absence status in patients with history of absence seizures. Concomitant topiramate may cause hyperammonemic encephalopathy, hypothermia. May interfere with urine ketone and thyroid tests. Others: see full labeling.

Adverse Reactions:

Abdominal pain, accidental injury, alopecia, ambylopia/blurred vision, amnesia, anorexia, asthenia, ataxia, back pain, bronchitis, constipation, depression, diarrhea, diplopia, dizziness, dyspepsia, dyspnea, ecchymosis, emotional lability, fever, flu syndrome, headache, increased appetite, infection, insomnia, nausea, nervousness, nystagmus, peripheral edema, pharyngitis, rash, rhinitis, somnolence, abnormal thinking, thrombocytopenia, tinnitus, tremor, vomiting, weight gain, weight loss; hepatotoxicity, structural birth defects, acute pancreatitis, hyperammonemia, hypothermia.

How Supplied:

Tabs 125mg—100; Tabs 250mg, 500mg—100, 500; ER 250mg—100; ER 500mg—100, 500

Pricing for DEPAKOTE

500mgtablet (Qty: 60)

Appx. price $17

GoodRx

Mood disorders:

Indications for: DEPAKOTE

Mania associated with bipolar disorder.

Limitations of Use:

Not for treating women with epilepsy or bipolar disorder during pregnancy or plan to become pregnant unless other alternatives failed to provide adequate control or are otherwise unacceptable.

Adult Dosage:

≥18yrs: initially 750mg daily in divided doses; max 60mg/kg per day. Elderly: reduce initial dose and titrate slowly; monitor. Concomitant rufinamide: initiate at a low dose and titrate; see full labeling.

Children Dosage:

<18yrs: not recommended.

DEPAKOTE Contraindications:

Hepatic disease or significant hepatic dysfunction. Known mitochondrial disorders caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG). Suspected POLG-related disorder in children <2yrs of age. Urea cycle disorders.

Boxed Warning:

Life-threatening adverse reactions (eg, hepatotoxicity, fetal risk, pancreatitis).

DEPAKOTE Warnings/Precautions:

Increased risk of hepatotoxicity in patients with congenital metabolic disorders, multiple AEDs, severe seizure disorders with mental retardation, organic brain disorders, mitochondrial disorders, esp. in children <2yrs of age. Increased risk of major congenital malformations (eg, spina bifida), decreased IQ scores, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Discontinue if hepatic dysfunction, pancreatitis, thrombocytopenia, hyperammonemia, hypothermia, or DRESS/multi-organ hypersensitivity reactions occur. History of liver disease; monitor liver function and clinical symptoms prior to therapy and at frequent intervals (esp. for 1st 6 mos). Follow-up if symptoms of hyperammonemia occur. Suicidal tendencies (monitor). Depakote ER is not bioequivalent to delayed-release tabs on mg/mg basis. Avoid abrupt cessation. Monitor CBCs, coagulation tests (at baseline, before surgery, and in pregnancy); reevaluate periodically. May affect HIV or CMV viral load (in vitro). Monitor motor and cognitive functions routinely. Elderly (monitor fluid and nutritional intake, and for somnolence). Pregnancy: avoid. Advise females of childbearing potential of risks to fetus; if treatment needed, use effective contraception. Nursing mothers: monitor infants.

DEPAKOTE Classification:

DEPAKOTE Interactions:

Monitor levels of valproate, ethosuximide, other anticonvulsants, and whenever an enzyme inducer is added or withdrawn. Potentiates carbamazepine, diazepam, ethosuximide, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, tolbutamide, warfarin, zidovudine, amitriptyline, nortriptyline, propofol, rufinamide. Potentiated by aspirin, felbamate. Efficacy reduced by rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, carbapenems, estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives; monitor serum valproate concentrations. CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants. Clonazepam may induce absence status in patients with history of absence seizures. Concomitant topiramate may cause hyperammonemic encephalopathy, hypothermia. May interfere with urine ketone and thyroid tests. Others: see full labeling.

Adverse Reactions:

Abdominal pain, accidental injury, alopecia, ambylopia/blurred vision, amnesia, anorexia, asthenia, ataxia, back pain, bronchitis, constipation, depression, diarrhea, diplopia, dizziness, dyspepsia, dyspnea, ecchymosis, emotional lability, fever, flu syndrome, headache, increased appetite, infection, insomnia, nausea, nervousness, nystagmus, peripheral edema, pharyngitis, rash, rhinitis, somnolence, abnormal thinking, thrombocytopenia, tinnitus, tremor, vomiting, weight gain, weight loss; hepatotoxicity, structural birth defects, acute pancreatitis, hyperammonemia, hypothermia.

How Supplied:

Tabs 125mg—100; Tabs 250mg, 500mg—100, 500; ER 250mg—100; ER 500mg—100, 500

Pricing for DEPAKOTE

500mgtablet (Qty: 60)

Appx. price $17

GoodRx

Seizure disorders:

Indications for: DEPAKOTE

Monotherapy or adjunct in complex partial seizures; simple or complex absence seizures. Adjunct in multiple seizure types.

Limitations of Use:

Not for treating women with epilepsy or bipolar disorder during pregnancy or plan to become pregnant unless other alternatives failed to provide adequate control or are otherwise unacceptable.

Adults and Children:

May swallow caps whole or sprinkle contents on soft food. Complex partial: <10yrs: not recommended. ≥10yrs: initially 10–15mg/kg per day. Absence seizures: initially 15mg/kg per day. Both: may increase weekly by 5–10mg/kg per day; max 60mg/kg per day; give in divided doses if total daily dose >250mg. Elderly: reduce initial dose and titrate slowly; monitor. Concomitant rufinamide: initiate at a low dose and titrate; see full labeling.

DEPAKOTE Contraindications:

Hepatic disease or significant hepatic dysfunction. Known mitochondrial disorders caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG). Suspected POLG-related disorder in children <2yrs of age. Urea cycle disorders.

Boxed Warning:

Life-threatening adverse reactions (eg, hepatotoxicity, fetal risk, pancreatitis).

DEPAKOTE Warnings/Precautions:

Increased risk of hepatotoxicity in patients with congenital metabolic disorders, multiple AEDs, severe seizure disorders with mental retardation, organic brain disorders, mitochondrial disorders, esp. in children <2yrs of age. Increased risk of major congenital malformations (eg, spina bifida), decreased IQ scores, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Discontinue if hepatic dysfunction, pancreatitis, thrombocytopenia, hyperammonemia, hypothermia, or DRESS/multi-organ hypersensitivity reactions occur. History of liver disease; monitor liver function and clinical symptoms prior to therapy and at frequent intervals (esp. for 1st 6 mos). Follow-up if symptoms of hyperammonemia occur. Suicidal tendencies (monitor). Depakote ER is not bioequivalent to delayed-release tabs on mg/mg basis. Avoid abrupt cessation. Monitor CBCs, coagulation tests (at baseline, before surgery, and in pregnancy); reevaluate periodically. May affect HIV or CMV viral load (in vitro). Monitor motor and cognitive functions routinely. Elderly (monitor fluid and nutritional intake, and for somnolence). Pregnancy: avoid. Advise females of childbearing potential of risks to fetus; if treatment needed, use effective contraception. Nursing mothers: monitor infants.

DEPAKOTE Classification:

DEPAKOTE Interactions:

Monitor levels of valproate, ethosuximide, other anticonvulsants, and whenever an enzyme inducer is added or withdrawn. Potentiates carbamazepine, diazepam, ethosuximide, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, tolbutamide, warfarin, zidovudine, amitriptyline, nortriptyline, propofol, rufinamide. Potentiated by aspirin, felbamate. Efficacy reduced by rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, carbapenems, estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives; monitor serum valproate concentrations. CNS depression with alcohol, other CNS depressants. Clonazepam may induce absence status in patients with history of absence seizures. Concomitant topiramate may cause hyperammonemic encephalopathy, hypothermia. May interfere with urine ketone and thyroid tests. Others: see full labeling.

Adverse Reactions:

Abdominal pain, accidental injury, alopecia, ambylopia/blurred vision, amnesia, anorexia, asthenia, ataxia, back pain, bronchitis, constipation, depression, diarrhea, diplopia, dizziness, dyspepsia, dyspnea, ecchymosis, emotional lability, fever, flu syndrome, headache, increased appetite, infection, insomnia, nausea, nervousness, nystagmus, peripheral edema, pharyngitis, rash, rhinitis, somnolence, abnormal thinking, thrombocytopenia, tinnitus, tremor, vomiting, weight gain, weight loss; hepatotoxicity, structural birth defects, acute pancreatitis, hyperammonemia, hypothermia.

How Supplied:

Tabs 125mg—100; Tabs 250mg, 500mg—100, 500; Sprinkle caps—100; ER 250mg—100; ER 500mg—100, 500

Pricing for DEPAKOTE

500mgtablet (Qty: 60)

Appx. price $17

GoodRx

Sours: https://www.empr.com/drug/depakote/
  1. Vbeln field in sap
  2. Nails 21 prices
  3. Samsung account app
  4. Brain burning sensation
  5. Agma io name

About Depakote

WHAT IS DEPAKOTE USED FOR?1-3

DEPAKOTE comes in different dosage forms. DEPAKOTE® (divalproex sodium) delayed-release tablets, for oral use, and DEPAKOTE® ER (divalproex sodium) extended-release tablets, for oral use, are prescription medications used:

  • to treat manic episodes associated with bipolar disorder
  • alone or with other medicines to treat:
    • complex partial seizures in adults and children 10 years of age and older
    • simple and complex absence seizures, with or without other seizure types
  • to prevent migraine headaches

DEPAKOTE® Sprinkle Capsules (divalproex sodium delayed release capsules), for oral use, is a prescription medicine used alone or with other medicines to treat:

  • complex partial seizures in adults and children 10 years of age and older
  • simple and complex absence seizures, with or without other seizure types

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION1-3

The most important information about DEPAKOTE is:

Do not stop taking DEPAKOTE without first talking to your healthcare provider. Stopping DEPAKOTE suddenly can cause serious problems.

DEPAKOTE can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Serious liver damage that can cause death, especially in children younger than 2 years old. The risk of getting this serious liver damage is more likely to happen within the first 6 months of treatment. In some cases, liver damage may continue despite stopping the drug. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: nausea or vomiting that does not go away, loss of appetite, pain on the right side of your stomach (abdomen), dark urine, swelling of your face, or yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.
  • DEPAKOTE may harm your unborn baby. If you take DEPAKOTE during pregnancy for any medical condition, your baby is at risk for serious birth defects that affect the brain and spinal cord and are called spina bifida or neural tube defects. These defects occur in 1 to 2 out of every 100 babies born to mothers who use this medicine during pregnancy. These defects can begin in the first month, even before you know you are pregnant. Other birth defects that affect the structures of the heart, head, arms, legs, and the opening where the urine comes out (urethra) on the bottom of the penis can also happen. Birth defects may occur even in children born to women who are not taking any medicines and do not have other risk factors. Taking folic acid supplements before getting pregnant and during early pregnancy can lower the chance of having a baby with a neural tube defect. If you take DEPAKOTE during pregnancy for any medical condition, your child is at risk for having a lower IQ and may be at risk for developing autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. There may be other medicines to treat your condition that have a lower chance of causing birth defects, decreased IQ, or other disorders in your child. Women who are pregnant must not take DEPAKOTE to prevent migraine headaches. All women of childbearing age (including girls from the start of puberty) should talk to their healthcare provider about using other possible treatments instead of DEPAKOTE. If the decision is made to use DEPAKOTE, you should use effective birth control (contraception). Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant while taking DEPAKOTE. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will continue to take DEPAKOTE while you are pregnant. Pregnancy Registry: If you become pregnant while taking DEPAKOTE, talk to your healthcare provider about registering with the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry. You can enroll in this registry by calling toll-free 1-888-233-2334 or by visiting the website, www.aedpregnancyregistry.org. The purpose of this registry is to collect information about the safety of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy.
  • Inflammation of your pancreas that can cause death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms: severe stomach pain that you may also feel in your back, nausea or vomiting that does not go away.
  • Like other antiepileptic drugs, DEPAKOTE may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; new or worse depression; new or worse anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); new or worse irritability; acting aggressive, being angry, or violent; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. How can I watch for early symptoms of suicidal thoughts and actions? Pay attention to any changes, especially sudden changes in mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Keep all follow-up visits with your healthcare provider as scheduled. Call your healthcare provider between visits as needed, especially if you are worried about symptoms.

Do not take DEPAKOTE if you:

  • have liver problems
  • have or think you have a genetic liver problem caused by a mitochondrial disorder (e.g., Alpers Huttenlocher Syndrome)
  • are allergic to divalproex sodium, valproic acid, sodium valproate, or any of the ingredients in DEPAKOTE
  • have a genetic problem called urea cycle disorder
  • are taking it to prevent migraine headaches and are either pregnant or may become pregnant because you are not using effective birth control (contraception)

Before taking DEPAKOTE, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have a genetic liver problem caused by a mitochondrial disorder (e.g., Alpers Huttenlocher Syndrome)
  • drink alcohol
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding since DEPAKOTE can pass into breast milk. Ask your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby.
  • have or have had depression, mood problems, or suicidal thoughts or behavior
  • have any other medical condition

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements.

Taking DEPAKOTE with certain other medicines, even for a short period of time, can cause side effects or affect how well they work. Do not start or stop other medicines without talking to your healthcare provider.

DEPAKOTE can cause other serious side effects, including:

  • Bleeding problems: red or purple spots on your skin, bruising, pain and swelling into your joints due to bleeding or bleeding from your mouth or nose.
  • High ammonia levels in your blood: feeling tired, vomiting, changes in mental status.
  • Low body temperature (hypothermia): drop in your body temperature to less than 95º F, feeling tired, confusion, coma.
  • Allergic (hypersensitivity) reactions: fever, skin rash, hives, sores in your mouth, blistering and peeling of your skin, swelling of your lymph nodes, swelling of your face, eyes, lips, tongue, or throat, trouble swallowing or breathing.
  • Drowsiness or sleepiness in the elderly. This extreme drowsiness may cause you to eat or drink less than you normally would. Tell your doctor if you are not able to eat or drink as you normally do. Your doctor may start you at a lower dose of DEPAKOTE.

Common side effects of DEPAKOTE include:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • weight gain
  • problems with walking or coordination
  • headache
  • weakness
  • stomach pain
  • diarrhea
  • hair loss
  •  
  • sleepiness
  • tremor
  • blurry vision
  • increased appetite
  • loss of appetite

Please see the full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, for additional information about DEPAKOTE. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are having difficulty paying for your medicine, AbbVie may be able to help. Visit Abbvie.com/myAbbVieAssist to learn more.

Sours: https://www.depakote.com/about-depakote
Divalproex Tablet - Drug Information

Valproic Acid

pronounced as (val proe' ik)

Divalproex sodium, valproate sodium, and valproic acid, are all similar medications that are used by the body as valproic acid. Therefore, the term valproic acid will be used to represent all of these medications in this discussion.

Valproic acid may cause serious or life-threatening damage to the liver that is most likely to occur within the first 6 months of therapy. The risk of developing liver damage is greater in children who are younger than 2 years of age and are also taking more than one medication to prevent seizures, have certain inherited diseases that may prevent the body from changing food to energy normally, or any condition that affects the ability to think, learn, and understand. Tell your doctor if you have a certain inherited condition that affects the brain, muscles, nerves, and liver (Alpers Huttenlocher Syndrome), urea cycle disorder (an inherited condition that affects the ability to metabolize protein), or liver disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take valproic acid. If you notice that your seizures are more severe or happen more often or if you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: excessive tiredness, lack of energy, weakness, pain on the right side of your stomach, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting,, dark urine, yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, or swelling of the face.

Valproic acid can cause serious birth defects (physical problems that are present at birth), especially affecting the brain and spinal cord and can also cause lower intelligence and problems with movement and coordination, learning, communication, emotions, and behavior in babies exposed to valproic acid before birth. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Women who are pregnant or who are able to become pregnant and are not using effective birth control must not take valproic acid to prevent migraine headaches. Women who are pregnant should only take valproic acid to treat seizures or bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods) if other medications have not successfully controlled their symptoms or cannot be used. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using valproic acid during pregnancy. If you are a woman of childbearing age, including girls from the start of puberty, talk to your doctor about using other possible treatments instead of valproic acid. If the decision is made to use valproic acid, you must use effective birth control during your treatment. Talk to your doctor about birth control methods that will work for you. If you become pregnant while taking valproic acid, call your doctor immediately. Valproic acid can harm the fetus.

Valproic acid may cause serious or life-threatening damage to the pancreas. This may occur at any time during your treatment. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: ongoing pain that begins in the stomach area but may spread to the back nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to valproic acid.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking valproic acid or of giving valproic acid to your child.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with valproic acid and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of frenzied, abnormally excited mood) in people with bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). It is also used to prevent migraine headaches but not to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by increasing the amount of a certain natural substance in the brain.

Valproic acid comes as a capsule, an extended-release (long-acting) tablet, a delayed-release (releases the medication in the intestine to prevent damage to the stomach) tablet, a sprinkle capsule (capsule that contains small beads of medication that can be sprinkled on food), and a syrup (liquid) to take by mouth. The syrup, capsules, delayed-release tablets, and sprinkle capsules are usually taken two or more times daily. The extended-release tablets are usually taken once a day. Take valproic acid at around the same time(s) every day. Take valproic acid with food to help prevent the medication from upsetting your stomach. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take valproic acid exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the regular capsules, delayed-release capsule, and extended-release tablets whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

You can swallow the sprinkle capsules whole, or you can open the capsules and sprinkle the beads they contain on a teaspoonful of soft food, such as applesauce or pudding. Swallow the mixture of food and medication beads right after you prepare it. Be careful not to chew the beads. Do not store unused mixtures of food and medication.

Do not mix the syrup into any carbonated drink.

Divalproex sodium, valproate sodium, and valproic acid products are absorbed by the body in different ways and cannot be substituted for one another. If you need to switch from one product to another, your doctor may need to adjust your dose. Each time you receive your medication, check to be sure that you have received the product that was prescribed for you. Ask your pharmacist if you are not sure that you received the right medication.

Your doctor may start you on a low dose of valproic acid and gradually increase your dose.

Valproic acid may help to control your condition but will not cure it. Continue to take valproic acid even if you feel well. Do not stop taking valproic acid without talking to your doctor, even if you experience side effects such as unusual changes in behavior or mood or if you find out that you are pregnant. If you suddenly stop taking valproic acid, you may experience a severe, long-lasting and possibly life-threatening seizure. Your doctor will probably decrease your dose gradually.

Valproic acid is also sometimes used to treat outbursts of aggression in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; more difficulty focusing or remaining still or quiet than other people who are the same age). Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before taking valproic acid,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to valproic acid, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in the type of valproic acid that has been prescribed for you. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: acyclovir (Zovirax), anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), amitriptyline, aspirin, carbamazepine (Tegretol), cholestyramine (Prevalite), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), doripenem (Doribax), ertapenem (Invanz), ethosuximide (Zarontin), felbamate (Felbatol), certain hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, rings, patches, implants, injections, and intrauterine devices), imipenem and cilastatin (Primaxin), lamotrigine (Lamictal),medications for anxiety or mental illness, meropenem (Merrem), nortriptyline (Pamelor), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), primidone (Mysoline), rifampin (Rifadin), rufinamide (Banzel), sedatives, sleeping pills, tolbutamide, topiramate (Topamax),tranquilizers,and zidovudine (Retrovir). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had episodes of confusion and loss of ability to think and understand, especially during pregnancy or childbirth; coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time); difficulty coordinating your movements; human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); or cytomegalovirus (CMV; a virus that can cause symptoms in people who have weak immune systems).
  • tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking valproic acid.
  • you should know that valproic acid may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication.
  • you should know that valproic acid can cause extreme drowsiness that may cause you to eat or drink less than you normally would, especially if you are elderly. Tell your doctor if you are not able to eat or drink as you normally do.
  • you should know that your mental health may change in unexpected ways and you may become suicidal (thinking about harming or killing yourself or planning or trying to do so) while you are taking valproic acid for the treatment of epilepsy, mental illness, or other conditions. A small number of adults and children 5 years of age and older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as valproic acid to treat various conditions during clinical studies became suicidal during their treatment. Some of these people developed suicidal thoughts and behavior as early as one week after they started taking the medication. There is a risk that you may experience changes in your mental health if you take an anticonvulsant medication such as valproic acid, but there may also be a risk that you will experience changes in your mental health if your condition is not treated. You and your doctor will decide whether the risks of taking an anticonvulsant medication are greater than the risks of not taking the medication. You, your family, or your caregiver should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: panic attacks; agitation or restlessness; new or worsening irritability, anxiety, or depression; acting on dangerous impulses; difficulty falling or staying asleep; aggressive, angry, or violent behavior; mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood); talking or thinking about wanting to hurt yourself or end your life; withdrawing from friends and family; preoccupation with death and dying; giving away prized possessions; or any other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • sleepiness
  • irregular heartbeat
  • coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time)

If you are taking the sprinkle capsules, you may notice the medication beads in your stool. This is normal and does not mean that you did not get the full dose of medication.

If you have diabetes and your doctor has told you to test your urine for ketones, tell the doctor that you are taking valproic acid. Valproic acid can cause false results on urine tests for ketones.

Before having any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are taking valproic acid.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

  • Depakene®
  • Depakote®
  • Depakote® ER
  • Depakote® Sprinkle
  • Divalproex sodium
  • Valproate sodium
Last Revised - 04/15/2019

Browse Drugs and Medicines

Sours: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a682412.html

Classification depakote

.

How to Medical Code for Long Term Use of Depakote Z79 899

.

You will also be interested:

.



179 180 181 182 183